238 Works

Aesthetic Proximity

Jolien Van Keulen
Implications of the transnationalisation of television are often studied by focusing on the localisation of the content of formatted programmes. Although television is essentially an audio-visual medium, little attention has been paid to the aesthetic aspects of television texts in relation to transnationalisation and formatting. Transnationalisation of production practices, such as through formatting, implies a transnational aesthetic. At the same time, aspects of style are specific to place, culture or audience. In this article, the...

Histoire Parallèle/die Woche vor 50 Jahren (la SEPT/ARTE 1989-2001)

Jean Christophe Meyer
This contribution is aimed at analyzing the public impact of „Histoire Parallèle/Die Woche vor 50 Jahren“, a history show that stands out by its longevity and conceptual design. This study is founded on archive material and statistical data (Institut National de l’Audiovisuel, Arte, Deutsches Rundfunk Archiv, …), contemporary literature and press coverage as well as on an interview with Marc Ferro, the mainstay of this show.

The Lessons of Counterpoint: Wolfgang Ernst’s Media Archaeology and Television Archive Research

Ken Griffin
The writings of the German scholar Wolfgang Ernst have become increasingly influential within media archaeology in recent years. His work adopts a strongly techno-centric approach and identifies archives as important study centres. Paradoxically, practical archival evidence is sometimes lacking within Ernst’s output. This paper uses evidence from a recent television archive project to examine aspects of Ernst’s approach. This exercise sought to uncover source material relating to a Northern Irish current affairs series, Counterpoint (1978-96),...

If Content Is King, Context Is Its Crown

Pelle Snickars
The future of television—if former Google CEO Eric Schmidt has his way—will use computational modes to attract viewers, structure results, contextual queries and/or evolving viewing patterns within an emerging televisual datascape. Departing from Schmidt's recent MacTaggart lecture this article tries to track the coded consequences of TV as data, not the least from an audiovisual heritage perspective.

European Television History Online

Sonja De Leeuw
Increasingly television heritage is being digitized and made accessible to non- industry user, enabling ‘the archival turn’: the study of online archives so as to revisit the dominant discourses in television historiography. This article discusses both conceptual and practical perspectives on online television heritage within a broader European frame- work. It starts from the notion of connectivity, pointing to the development of the archive as a network of connections and continues to address the dynamics...

Parallel Stories, Differentiated Histories

José Carlos Rueda Laffond, Carlota Coronado Ruiz, Catarina Duff Burnay, Susana Díaz Pérez, Amparo Guerra Gómez & Rogério Santos
Integrated into an international project on the characteristics of historical fiction on TV in Spain and Portugal during 2001–2012, the study traces the main aspects of these productions as entertainment products and memory strategies. Historical fiction on Iberian television channels express qualitative problems of interpretation. Its development must be related to issues such practices, meanings and forms of recognition, and connected with specific memory systems. The article explores a set of key–points: uses and topics...

‘Remembering Our First TV Set’

Cecilia Penati
Personal memories represent a crucial source in outlining a history of television audience. However, they are undoubtedly special historical tools, and their interpretation requires particular cares and concerns. Relying on interviews leaded on direct witnesses, the paper describes the advent of television in the private space of the home in the mid fifties in Italy, comparing personal memories with the interpretative repertoires filtered down by the popular media system. The paper also tries to add...

Democratic Television in the Netherlands: Two Curious Cases of Alternative Media as Counter-technologies

Tom Slootweg & Susan Aasman
For this article, the authors retrieved two curious cases of nonconformist TV from the archives of The Netherlands Institute of Sound and Vision. Being made in the late 1970s and early 1980s, the two cases represent an alternative history of broadcast television in the Netherlands. Whereas Neon (1979-1980) aimed to establish a punk-inspired DIY video culture, Ed van der Elsken (1980, 1981) strived for an expressive amateur film culture. The authors propose to regarded these...

Understanding Socialist Television: Concepts, Objects, Methods

Sabina Mihelj
This article develops a number of conceptual and methodological proposals aimed at furthering a firmer agenda for the field of socialist television studies. It opens by addressing the issue of relevance of the field, identifying three critical contributions the study of socialist television can make to media, communication and cultural studies. It then puts forward a number of proposals tied to three key issues: strategies of overcoming the Cold War framework that dominates much of...

Without Latency: Cathode Immersions and the Neglected Practice of Xenocasting for Television and Radio

Adam Hulbert
This paper discusses a three-year radio project Cathode Immersions, which was aired on 2SER in Sydney Australia. The audio that accompanied free-to-air television was remixed and rebroadcast in real time without latency. It explores the human and non-human aspects of the convergence of these two media, introducing ideas of xenocasting and media adjacency. The weekly xenocast of Cathode Immersions afforded unique translations of cultural narratives, from commentary on the Gulf War to machinic perspectives on...

Hello, Lenin?

Kateryna Khinkulova
After the collapse of the USSR in 1991, Soviet television looked old-fashioned and seemed redundant, with the emerging post-Soviet televisual cultures turning their gazes to global sources of inspiration. The next decade affected Russia and Ukraine in very different ways. In Russia brief exposure to what was seen as “cheap mass-culture” left TV viewers and producers disillusioned. With the change of attitude towards Western TV, the ideas about Soviet TV changed, too. From a grey...

Editorial

Andy O'Dwyer & Tim O'Sulivan
We know little about the ‘behind the scenes’ of television. While the booming field of production studies has been shining a light on the work processes and the personnel in production spaces, there is still a lot to be learnt about the ‘hidden’ professions of television. This issue of VIEW provides a rich but fairly eclectic series of contributions based on the theme.

Editorial: Towards an Archaeology of Television

Anne-Katrin Weber & Andreas Fickers
Over the last few years, ‘media archaeology’ has evolved from a marginal topic to an academic approach en vogue. Under its banner, conferences and publications bring together scholars from different disciplines who, revisiting the canon of media history and theory, emphasize the necessity for renewed historiographical narratives. Despite, or maybe because of profuse debates, media archaeology remains a loosely defined playground for researchers working at the intersection of history and theory. Far from offering uniform...

TV on the Radio/ Radio on Television

Alexander Badenoch & Berber Hagedoorn
Radio is only to a limited extent a ‘blind medium’. Visual and material aspects have long played a role in the way the medium has acquired meaning. While print has become a common source for radio history, audiovisual material – such as is preserved on the EUscreen portal with extensive metadata and potential for context – offers potential not just for understanding the evolution of television, but rather the entire mass-media ensemble. This article explores...

Adapting university education in a digital and globally networked world

Mona Jimenez
Since 2003, the Moving Image Archiving and Preservation Program (MIAP) at New York University has graduated nearly 90 new moving image preservation professionals. Practices for moving image archiving and preservation have changed dramatically since the programme began. In addition, ‘born-digital’ productions have become the norm. Thus, MIAP has needed to continually adapt to the increasingly broad nature of heritage collections, and to new approaches and practices aimed at maintaining perpetual access to moving image works....

Rational Wizards: Audience Interpreters in French Television

Jérôme Bourdon & Cécile Méadel
This paper will tell the story of the smallgroup of people who, in France, have been in charge of the measurement and theappreciation of the audience of television, and had to invent audience research,to organize it and to communicate its results to "clients" whodepended on it much earlier than usually assumed: television managers andprofessionals, public authorities, and, last but not least, advertisers. The paper will explore both change andcontinuity. First, change: the professional origin and...

Television as a Hybrid Repertoire of Memory

Berber Hagedoorn
In this article, television is reconsidered as a hybrid ‘repertoire’ ofmemory. It is demonstrated how new dynamic production and scheduling practicesin connection with highly accessible and participatory forms of user engagementoffer opportunities for television users to engage with the past, and how suchpractices affect television as a practice of memory. The media platform HollandDoc is discussed as a principal casestudy. By adopting and expanding Aleida Assmann’s model of the dynamics ofcultural memory between remembering and...

The Life and Afterlife of a Socialist Media Friend

Kinga S. Bloch
This paper analyses how the relationship of the Polish audience to a series from the 1970s, Czterdziestolatek (The Fourty-Year Old) evolved during socialism and after the Fall of the Iron Curtain. Contemporary reactions to the original series and a new season that was produced in the early 1990s are compared to nostalgic recollections and memories of the programme in later periods. The study discusses how the Polish audience uses the programme as a historical document...

Editorial

Claude Mussou & Mette Charis Buchman
Archives have traditionally been the result of individual or collective decisions taken on political, institutional or business grounds in order to preserve documents and make these accessible for use. In the current digital ‘era of plenty,’ which enables an unprecedented creation of, and access to archival content, it seems that the very definition of an archive and its usage is being challenged. As a journal that aims to bring together archival expertise and academic knowledge...

Building Platforms For Historians

Lilian Landes
Each discipline and subject traditionally has specific needs regarding digital work and research environments. Still, essential thematic complexes which are especially important in terms of the conception and establishment of scholarly platforms providing content in Open Access, can be named: Based on specific examples from the field of history in Germany, the article considers four categories: content selection policy, digitalisation, content genres and contextualisation. With the development of user requirements over the last 10 years,...

"It's Just So Hard to Bring It to Mind"

Hazel Collie
Memory is theorised as constructive and unreliable, while television has been characterised as forgettable and guilty of undermining memory. In a recent series of oral history interviews I asked British women of different generations to tell me their memories of television in the period 1947 to 1989. This article presents some of their memories to demonstrate how, far from undermining memory, television is used a type of memory text for particular life stages.

Because His Bike Stood There

Frank Kessler
The article discusses the use and post-production treatment of footage shot by Dutch filmmaker Louis van Gasteren in his documentary Because My Bike Stood There (1966). The images depict a young man being beaten up by the police during a clash between the forces of order and people waiting to enter a photo exhibition on, ironically, police violence that had occurred about ten days earlier in Amsterdam. Van Gasteren combines the footage with an interview...

I’m Sorry I Don’t Have a Story

Adrian Miles
I don’t know what this is, which is a strange place from which to begin. This is unsettling, for as an academic I am trained and acculturated to displaying a certainty of manner — a certainty that many of my students and conference colleagues would attest I have down pat. It begins from Bristol. It begins from Alisa Lebow’s presentation at the 2016 i–Docs conference about her interactive documentary Filming Revolution. It begins from what...

Old Stories and New Developments

Alexander Badenoch, Jasmijn Van Gorp, Berber Hagedoorn, Judith Keilbach, Eggo Müller & Daniela Mustata
It is our great pleasure to present this special issue of VIEW Journal of European Television and Culture in honour of Sonja de Leeuw, one of the founding members of the journal. The issue brings together articles that honour Sonja’s inspiring contributions to television history and television historiography.

The Legatum initiative

Rubens Ribeiro Goncalves Da Silva, Ricardo Sodre Andrade, Adriana Cox Hollos, Neiva P Avezi, Joao Ricardo Chagas Dos Santos & Research Team
This paper summarizes the preliminary findings of the second phase of a research project entitled Digital Challenges and Alternatives for the Safeguarding and Dissemination of Public Audiovisual Archival Heritage (2013–2016). The final phase, lasting three years, is currently in progress and will finish in 2019. The project has collected data on audiovisual archives across Brazil, inquiring about collections scopes, environments, planning and more. One aspect of the project has been developing a beta version of...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    22
  • 2016
    39
  • 2017
    131
  • 2018
    46

Resource Types

  • Text
    233
  • Audiovisual
    1