22 Works

Authorship, Autobiography and the Archive

Paul Kerr
In 2004, documentary theorist Michael Renov described ‘the recent turn to filmic autobiography’ as ‘the defining trend of “post-verite” documentary practice...’ In 2008 Renov went further still, suggesting that ‘the very idea of autobiography challenges/reinvents the VERY IDEA of documentary.’ Archive based autobiographical filmmaking, meanwhile, is even more problematic for documentary theory. Indeed, a number of recent documentaries, because of their status somewhere in the spectrum between biography and autobiography, have prompted the construction of...

Archive Footage in New Programmes

Steve George Bryant
Archivists have traditionally been concerned about what they have seen as incorrect usage of archival footage in new documentaries, but changing technologies and programme-making conventions have made this inevitable. This paper considers aspects of these changes, focussing particularly on the issue of how the introduction of widescren television affected and continues to affect the aspect ratios in which archival materials are presented, using examples from recent and contemporary television documentaries from Britain and the USA.

Novel Televisual Environments: Immersive Spectatorship and the Future of Stereoscopic 3DTV

Ilkin Mehrabov
This article focuses on one of the most ground-breaking technological attempts in creating novel immersive media environments for heightened televisual user experiences: 3DTV, a Network of Excellence funded by the European Commission 6th Framework Information Society Technologies Programme. Based on the theoretical framework outlined by the works of Jonathan Crary and Brian Winston, and on empirical data obtained from author’s fieldwork and laboratory visit notes, as well as discussions with practitioners, the article explores the...

Picking up (on) Fragments

Phil Ellis
This article discusses the implications for archival and media archaeological research and reenactment artwork relating to a recent arts practice project: reenacttv: 30 lines / 60 seconds. It proposes that archival material is unstable but has traces and fragments that are full of creative potential to re-think and re-examine past media historical events through a media archaeological approach to reenactment. The article contains images and links to videos from the final reenactment artworks as well...

Without Latency: Cathode Immersions and the Neglected Practice of Xenocasting for Television and Radio

Adam Hulbert
This paper discusses a three-year radio project Cathode Immersions, which was aired on 2SER in Sydney Australia. The audio that accompanied free-to-air television was remixed and rebroadcast in real time without latency. It explores the human and non-human aspects of the convergence of these two media, introducing ideas of xenocasting and media adjacency. The weekly xenocast of Cathode Immersions afforded unique translations of cultural narratives, from commentary on the Gulf War to machinic perspectives on...

Compiling European Immigration History

Andrea Meuzelaar
Today television's reliance on archival footage seems to be intensifying due to the increased accessibility of European broadcast archives and the increased amount of available digitized broadcast material. In this article, the author reflects on television's convention to compile stories from archival material by presenting a case-study of a recently broadcast Dutch television series Land of Promise (2014). This series narrates the history of European post-war immigration, and is constructed from archival material from various...

Eyewitnesses of History

Paolo Simoni
The role of amateur cinema as archival material in Italian media productions has only recently been discovered. Italy, as opposed to other European countries, lacked a local, regional and national policy for the collection and preservation of private audiovisual documents, which led, as a result, to the inaccessibility of the sources. In 2002 the Archivio Nazionale del Film di Famiglia (Italy’s Amateur Film Archive), founded in Bologna by the Home Movies Association, became the reference...

Editorial: Towards an Archaeology of Television

Anne-Katrin Weber & Andreas Fickers
Over the last few years, ‘media archaeology’ has evolved from a marginal topic to an academic approach en vogue. Under its banner, conferences and publications bring together scholars from different disciplines who, revisiting the canon of media history and theory, emphasize the necessity for renewed historiographical narratives. Despite, or maybe because of profuse debates, media archaeology remains a loosely defined playground for researchers working at the intersection of history and theory. Far from offering uniform...

Digital Media Archaeology: Uncovering the Digital Tool AVResearcherXL

Justin Van Wees, Sonja De Leeuw, Jasmijn Van Gorp & Bouke Huurnink
In this article, we will contribute to a methodological discussion in the Digital Humanities by uncovering the digital tool AVResearcherXL as a form of Digital Media Archaeology. AVResearcherXL enables to search across, compare and visualise the metadata of Dutch television and radio programmes and a selection of newspaper articles of the Dutch Royal Library. Media archaeology provides a fruitful framework to reflect on the tool as method for Television History Research. First, the tool in...

Editorial

Claude Mussou & Mette Charis Buchman
Archives have traditionally been the result of individual or collective decisions taken on political, institutional or business grounds in order to preserve documents and make these accessible for use. In the current digital ‘era of plenty,’ which enables an unprecedented creation of, and access to archival content, it seems that the very definition of an archive and its usage is being challenged. As a journal that aims to bring together archival expertise and academic knowledge...

Scratch's Third Body

Leo Goldsmith
Emerging in the UK in the 1980s, Scratch Video established a paradoxical union of mass-media critique, Left-wing politics, and music-video and advertising aesthetics with its use of moving-image appropriation in the medium of videotape. Enabled by innovative professional and consumer video technologies, artists like George Barber, The Gorilla Tapes, and Sandra Goldbacher and Kim Flitcroft deployed a style characterized by the rapid sampling and manipulation of dissociated images drawn from broadcast television. Inspired by the...

The Television Archive on BBC Four

Vana Goblot
Reusing audiovisual archive material is a growing trend on television and has many purposes, ranging for commercial to more ‘purely’ social and cultural ones. Focusing on the uses of the television archive on BBC Four, the BBC’s ‘custodian of archive’ and digital channel for arts, culture and ideas, this article examines a selection of archive rich programmes shown on the channel, in order to explore the ways in which the television archive is becoming indispensible...

Tom Swift’s Three Inventions of Television: Media History and the Technological Imaginary

Doron Galili
This article draws on fictional depiction of television in three novels in the Tom Swift series of boys' books, published in 1914, 1928, and 1933, in attempt to come to terms with different aspects of what sociologist of technology call the “technological imaginary” of television. As the novels’ depictions of the various television inventions demonstrate, the period of the first decades of the twentieth century was typified by a great deal of permutations in the...

The Lessons of Counterpoint: Wolfgang Ernst’s Media Archaeology and Television Archive Research

Ken Griffin
The writings of the German scholar Wolfgang Ernst have become increasingly influential within media archaeology in recent years. His work adopts a strongly techno-centric approach and identifies archives as important study centres. Paradoxically, practical archival evidence is sometimes lacking within Ernst’s output. This paper uses evidence from a recent television archive project to examine aspects of Ernst’s approach. This exercise sought to uncover source material relating to a Northern Irish current affairs series, Counterpoint (1978-96),...

Plundering' the Archive and the Recurring Joys of Television

Lisa Kerrigan
The seemingly unlimited digital landscape and the current proliferation of the use of archive footage on British television invite the notion that the appreciation of archive material as a historical object is a rather contemporary popular development. It seems unusual then, to find a series devoted to archive television in the mid 1960s. Largely showing excerpts from 1950s programmes, Plunder recalled what presenter Michell Raper called 'the vanished joys of television'. This article will detail...

Streaming: a Media Hydrography of Televisual Flows

Ghislain Thibault
This paper focuses on the continuities, rather than the ruptures, between digital television and past media forms. It situates the metaphor of “streaming” in contrast to and connection with previous fluid metaphors that have been used to describe different models of media transmission. From the early use of aqueous vocabulary that shaped popular and scientific understandings of electricity transmission to the seminal studies of mass communication concerning the flows of information, images of fluidity have...

Adapt Simulation: 16mm Film Editing for Television

John Ellis, Vanessa Jackson, Amanda Murphy & Rowan Aust
Two television editors who once worked with 16mm film discuss and explore their former working methods and demonstrate how to make a picture cut using film. The method of ‘hands-on history’ used for this simulation is discussed, as are the problems of presenting such data.

'Goodwill Ambassador'

Gerda Jansen Hendriks
The article looks back at the films commissioned and produced by the Dutch governments about their colony in teh East-Indies between 1912 and 1962. The main focus is on the newsreels and documentaries about the colonial war between the Netherlands and Indonesia from 1945 to 1949. The article reviews these films and the re-use of their footage in later television programs. The programs often look back at the colonial war in ways that go beyond...

Visions of Reconstruction

Floris Jan Willem Paalman
After WWII, films accompanied the reconstruction of Europe’s destroyed cities. Many contained historical footage. How was this material used, to articulate visions of reconstruction, what happened to the material later on, and how do the films relate to municipal film archives? This question is approached in terms of collective cognitive functions, applied to a media archaeological case study of Rotterdam. In focus are two audiovisual landmarks, from 1950 and 1966, and their historical footage, all...

Histoire Parallèle/die Woche vor 50 Jahren (la SEPT/ARTE 1989-2001)

Jean Christophe Meyer
This contribution is aimed at analyzing the public impact of „Histoire Parallèle/Die Woche vor 50 Jahren“, a history show that stands out by its longevity and conceptual design. This study is founded on archive material and statistical data (Institut National de l’Audiovisuel, Arte, Deutsches Rundfunk Archiv, …), contemporary literature and press coverage as well as on an interview with Marc Ferro, the mainstay of this show.

Democratic Television in the Netherlands: Two Curious Cases of Alternative Media as Counter-technologies

Tom Slootweg & Susan Aasman
For this article, the authors retrieved two curious cases of nonconformist TV from the archives of The Netherlands Institute of Sound and Vision. Being made in the late 1970s and early 1980s, the two cases represent an alternative history of broadcast television in the Netherlands. Whereas Neon (1979-1980) aimed to establish a punk-inspired DIY video culture, Ed van der Elsken (1980, 1981) strived for an expressive amateur film culture. The authors propose to regarded these...

Extending the Aerial: Uncovering Histories of Teletext and Telesoftware in Britain

Alison Gazzard
Beyond their roles of broadcasting programmed content into the homes of people around the country, Britain’s British Broadcasting Corporation and Independent Television stations delivered additional content via the home television set. This article will explore the British histories of Teletext and telesoftware in a wider context of microprocessing developments during the late 1970s and early 1980s through a media archaeological framework of their terminology and traits. Situating these developments in the industrial and political climates...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    22

Resource Types

  • Text
    19
  • Audiovisual
    1