46 Works

Keeping Up the Live

Karin Van Es & Judith Keilbach
Increasingly new media platforms are making claims to liveness. Looking back in television history we also find programmes that were recorded, but kept up the claims of being live. This raises the question as to what accounts for the attraction of the live? Focusing on Ein Platz für Tiere and the Netflix Live spoof of 2017 this article discusses disparate articulations of the live and addresses the need to balance freedom, chaos and control on...

Crossing the Theory-Practice Divide

Willemien Sanders, Daniel Everts & Bonnie Van Vught
Scholars are increasingly expected to share their knowledge through different media besides the written publication but struggle to do so. How might they teach their students the skills to do so? This article argues that Practice as Research, developed by practitioners venturing into academia, provides a useful framework to shape research outcomes into, for instance, video essays or interactive narratives. It is especially valuable to undergraduate students aiming to increase their knowledge and understanding of...

‘Great Stuff!’

Eggo Müller
In 2014, British Pathé launched its YouTube channel with more than 85,000 items of audiovisualheritage from the 20th century. This article analyses the curational strategies of this channel as developed bythe German multi-channel network Mediakraft in consideration of YouTube’s algorithms and supposed userexpectations. This article argues that, in the context of YouTube’s commercial ecosystem, Mediakraft’scuration emphasizes celebrities, spectacular historical events, and curiosities to attract users online.

Did Grace Kelly Shed a Tear?

John Ellis
Early television reveals the radical nature of the new medium as well as many of its affordances thatwere later rejected. The coverage of the Monegasque Royal Wedding of Prince Rainier of Monaco and GraceKelly exposes the differences between cinema newsreels and live TV, and how, even at a public event, TVcould invade the personal space of its subjects. Like a detective, the author reconstructs how this historicalevent was covered by film and TV, and how...

TV on the Radio/ Radio on Television

Alexander Badenoch & Berber Hagedoorn
Radio is only to a limited extent a ‘blind medium’. Visual and material aspects have long played a role in the way the medium has acquired meaning. While print has become a common source for radio history, audiovisual material – such as is preserved on the EUscreen portal with extensive metadata and potential for context – offers potential not just for understanding the evolution of television, but rather the entire mass-media ensemble. This article explores...

Because His Bike Stood There

Frank Kessler
The article discusses the use and post-production treatment of footage shot by Dutch filmmaker Louis van Gasteren in his documentary Because My Bike Stood There (1966). The images depict a young man being beaten up by the police during a clash between the forces of order and people waiting to enter a photo exhibition on, ironically, police violence that had occurred about ten days earlier in Amsterdam. Van Gasteren combines the footage with an interview...

Old Stories and New Developments

Alexander Badenoch, Jasmijn Van Gorp, Berber Hagedoorn, Judith Keilbach, Eggo Müller & Daniela Mustata
It is our great pleasure to present this special issue of VIEW Journal of European Television and Culture in honour of Sonja de Leeuw, one of the founding members of the journal. The issue brings together articles that honour Sonja’s inspiring contributions to television history and television historiography.

Towards a New Audiovisual Think Tank for Audiovisual Archivists and Cultural Heritage Professionals

Peter B. Kaufman
The White Paper "Towards a New Audiovisual Think Tank for Audiovisual Archivists and Cultural Heritage Professionals" aims to facilitate stakeholders active in the preservation of audiovisual heritage to identify their strategic priorities over the coming decade. The paper also puts forward ten recommendations for collective action to address these priorities. From the paper: "Archiving, properly defined, is the establishment and then stewardship of the human record, and the remembering that it facilitates may be the...

‘On the Road Again’

Andreas Fickers, Andy O’Dwyer & Alexandre Germain
This video documents the authors' journey back to the origins of transnational television in Europe. Inspired by the idea of experimental media archaeology (EMA), the trip to original locations of the transnational media event known as ‘Paris-week’ in 1952 illustrates a new approach to media historiography, which aims to sensitize television historians for the material remains, topography and physical spaces of early television transmissions. Readers /viewers are invited to watch the different episodes of the...

Is the End of Television Coming to an End?

Jérôme Bourdon
This article analyses the discourses of the end of television in relation to its status as a bad object. It traces the early, transnational, massive negative treatments of television. It suggests four explanations for this: sociological (television as a popular medium), economical (disappointing investment), metapsychological (frustrating experience), technological (insincere dispositif). It suggests that discourses of the end are coming to an end, because television is becoming a kind of archive, increasingly considered nostalgically, while its...

Televisual Satire in the Age of Glocalization

Ivo Nieuwenhuis
This article analyses the highly popular Dutch satirical TV-show Zondag met Lubach (ZML) from the perspective of ‘glocalization.’ This places the show both within the global tradition of late-night satire, originating in the United States, and in the local Dutch tradition of satirical TV. A general overview of these traditions is followed by a close reading of one ZML segment, which is then compared to the American show Last Week Tonight with John Oliver. This...

‘Failed Interviews’

Dana Mustata
This article zooms into the practice and historiographical implications of doing television history with women. Drawing primarily upon interviews with women having worked at Romanian television during communism, the article develops a conceptual understanding of ‘feminine voices’ as primary sources into television history. It situates these gendered historical sources within historiographical practices of accessing neglected, marginalized or silenced areas in television history, in other words, the ‘blind spots’ in the medium’s history.

What Is Not in the Archive

Jasmijn Van Gorp & Rosita Kiewik
This article discusses the pedagogy and outcome of a new assignment we introduced in the course ‘Television History Online’ at Utrecht University. We assigned the students the task to build a canon of a genre of Dutch television and create a video poster on the EUscreen portal consisting of clips that represent part of their canon. In our pedagogy, we argue that it is important to draw students’ attention to what is missing in the...

Tussen wetenschap en spektakel. Hypnose op de Belgische theaterscène, 1875–1900

Kaat Wils
Between Science and Spectacle: Hypnosison the Belgian Theatre Scene, 1875–1900 This article focuses on the performances of itinerant magnetiser/hypnotist Donato and on the public debate he generated on his travels throughout Europe. Around this time, magnetism was increasingly being presented in a new form – hypnotism – which walked the line between scientific experiment and public spectacle, navigating the realms of alternative medicine and of recognised medical therapies. This article explores Donato’s use of the...

Magie en wetenschap in de spektakelcultuur van de negentiende eeuw: Henri Robin in de Lage Landen

Kurt Vanhoutte & Nele Wynants
Magic and Science in the Nineteenth-century Culture of Spectacle: Henri Robin in the Low Countries The theatre of modernity served to illuminate scientific insight and discovery in a spectacular way. Astronomy, physics, and experiments with electricity were at the heart of a popular genre that became known as ‘physiques amusantes’ (amusing physics). These shows occupied a middle ground between entertainment and science, between showing and doing. They were often staged by magicians, who presented themselves...

Making Sense of the Data-driven: SETUP’s Algorithmic History Museum and Its Relevance for Contemporary Reflection

Maranke Wieringa
Review of The Algorithmic History Museum, an installation created by SETUP. It was on display at the Dutch Design Week 2017 (21– 29 October 2017, Eindhoven, the Netherlands).

Images of Occupation in Dutch Film

Chris Vos
Review of: Wendy Burke. Images of Occupation in Dutch Film. Memory, Myth and the Cultural Legacy of War. Amsterdam University Press, 2017, 262 pp.

The Database ‘Revolution’: The Technological and Cultural Origins of the Big-data-based Mindset in American Management, 1970s–1980s

Niels Kerssens
In this article, I counter persistent claims of big data revolutionising managerial decision making, by tracing the technological and cultural origins of data-based management in the United States back to the 1970s and 1980s using historical source materials from the trade magazine Datamation. I argue that innovations in database technology within this period – database management systems and the relational database model – shaped and reinforced a data-based mindset. This mindset, I demonstrate, is manifested...

Cinema Beyond the City. Small-Town & Rural Film Culture in Europe

Anton Schuurman
Review of: Judith Thissen & Clemens Zimmermann, ed. Cinema Beyond the City. Small-Town & Rural Film Culture in Europe. Palgrave, 2016, 256 pp.

Anne Helmond on Researching the History of the Web

Anne Helmond
Interview with Anne Helmond (University of Amsterdam) by Eef Masson and Karin van Es.

Mirko Tobias Schäfer on Entrepreneurial Research

Mirko Tobias Schäfer
Interview with Mirko Tobias Schäfer (Utrecht University) with Eef Masson and Karin van Es.

Big Data Histories: An Introduction

Karin Van Es & Eef Masson
Editorial for TMG 2018-2.

Alison Powell on Data Walking

Alison Powell
Interview with Alison Powell (London School of Economics) by Eef Masson and Karin van Es.

William Uricchio on the Colonization of the Data-Imaginary in the Public Service Sector

William Uricchio
Interview with William Uricchio (MIT) by Eef Masson and Karin van Es.

Data-Based Art, Algorithmic Poetry: Geert Mul in Conversation with Eef Masson

Geert Mul & Eef Masson
The award-winning media artist Geert Mul (the Netherlands, 1965) has been making computer based artworks for over twenty-five years. A large portion of his oeuvre, and his more recent work in particular, relies heavily on existing images, often sourced online. With the help of image analysis software, Mul reworks the pictures into new combinations, attracted by the unexpected results that algorithmic operations produce, and the revelatory potential they hold. The artist refers to this work...

Registration Year

  • 2018
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