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Comparison of 2D and 3D flame topography measured by planar laser-induced fluorescence and tomographic chemiluminescence

Lin Ma, Yue Wu, Wenjiang Xu, Stephen D. Hammack, Tonghun Lee & Campbell D. Carter
The goal of this work was to contrast and compare the 2D and 3D flame topography of a turbulent flame. The 2D measurements were obtained using CH-based (methylidyne radical-based) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), and the 3D measurements were obtained through a tomographic chemiluminescence (TC) technique. Both PLIF and TC were performed simultaneously on a turbulent premixed Bunsen flame. The PLIF measurements were then compared to a cross section of the 3D TC measurements, both to...

1: Comparison of 2D and 3D flame topography measured by planar laser-induced fluorescence and tomographic chemiluminescence

Lin Ma, Yue Wu, Wenjiang Xu, Stephen D. Hammack, Tonghun Lee & Campbell D. Carter
Originally published in Applied Optics on 10 July 2016 (ao-55-20-5310)

1: Comparison of 2D and 3D flame topography measured by planar laser-induced fluorescence and tomographic chemiluminescence

Lin Ma, Yue Wu, Wenjiang Xu, Stephen D. Hammack, Tonghun Lee & Campbell D. Carter
Originally published in Applied Optics on 10 July 2016 (ao-55-20-5310)

Comparison of 2D and 3D flame topography measured by planar laser-induced fluorescence and tomographic chemiluminescence

Lin Ma, Yue Wu, Wenjiang Xu, Stephen D. Hammack, Tonghun Lee & Campbell D. Carter
The goal of this work was to contrast and compare the 2D and 3D flame topography of a turbulent flame. The 2D measurements were obtained using CH-based (methylidyne radical-based) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), and the 3D measurements were obtained through a tomographic chemiluminescence (TC) technique. Both PLIF and TC were performed simultaneously on a turbulent premixed Bunsen flame. The PLIF measurements were then compared to a cross section of the 3D TC measurements, both to...

Thermal effects of laser marking on microstructure and corrosion properties of stainless steel

M. Švantner, M. Kučera, E. Smazalová, Š. Houdková & R. Čerstvý
Laser marking is an advanced technique used for modification of surface optical properties. This paper presents research on the influence of laser marking on the corrosion properties of stainless steel. Processes during the laser beam–surface interaction cause structure and color changes and can also be responsible for reduction of corrosion resistance of the surface. Corrosion tests, roughness, microscopic, energy dispersive x-ray, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and ferrite content analyses were carried out. It was found...

Data File 1: Thermal effects of laser marking on microstructure and corrosion properties of stainless steel

M. Švantner, M. Kučera, E. Smazalová, Š. Houdková & R. Čerstvý
Laser marking parameters related to results presented in Fig. 2. Originally published in Applied Optics on 01 December 2016 (ao-55-34-D35)

Data File 1: Thermal effects of laser marking on microstructure and corrosion properties of stainless steel

M. Švantner, M. Kučera, E. Smazalová, Š. Houdková & R. Čerstvý
Laser marking parameters related to results presented in Fig. 2. Originally published in Applied Optics on 01 December 2016 (ao-55-34-D35)

Thermal effects of laser marking on microstructure and corrosion properties of stainless steel

M. Švantner, M. Kučera, E. Smazalová, Š. Houdková & R. Čerstvý
Laser marking is an advanced technique used for modification of surface optical properties. This paper presents research on the influence of laser marking on the corrosion properties of stainless steel. Processes during the laser beam–surface interaction cause structure and color changes and can also be responsible for reduction of corrosion resistance of the surface. Corrosion tests, roughness, microscopic, energy dispersive x-ray, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and ferrite content analyses were carried out. It was found...

Visualization 5: Wide-area and omnidirectional optical detector arrays using modular optical elements

Asaad Kaadan, Hazem Refai & Peter LoPresti
Active object rotating around a spherical array. Originally published in Applied Optics on 20 June 2016 (ao-55-18-4791)

Visualization 5: Wide-area and omnidirectional optical detector arrays using modular optical elements

Asaad Kaadan, Hazem Refai & Peter LoPresti
Active object rotating around a spherical array. Originally published in Applied Optics on 20 June 2016 (ao-55-18-4791)

Wide-area and omnidirectional optical detector arrays using modular optical elements

Asaad Kaadan, Hazem Refai & Peter LoPresti
This paper presents novel, modular optical detector arrays of various shapes and configurations. Recently developed Modular Optical Wireless Elements (MOWE) architecture serves as the basis for large and complex optical detector arrays that can be constructed as geometric shells and provide wide-area even omnidirectional field-of-view (FoV). Programmable optical modules synchronously sample the environment, and then route measurements to the user through a dedicated electrical backbone. The arrays are inexpensive, easy to construct, and can be...

Wide-area and omnidirectional optical detector arrays using modular optical elements

Asaad Kaadan, Hazem Refai & Peter LoPresti
This paper presents novel, modular optical detector arrays of various shapes and configurations. Recently developed Modular Optical Wireless Elements (MOWE) architecture serves as the basis for large and complex optical detector arrays that can be constructed as geometric shells and provide wide-area even omnidirectional field-of-view (FoV). Programmable optical modules synchronously sample the environment, and then route measurements to the user through a dedicated electrical backbone. The arrays are inexpensive, easy to construct, and can be...

Visualization 4: Wide-area and omnidirectional optical detector arrays using modular optical elements

Asaad Kaadan, Hazem Refai & Peter LoPresti
Detecting two light beams in a flat array. Originally published in Applied Optics on 20 June 2016 (ao-55-18-4791)

Visualization 4: Wide-area and omnidirectional optical detector arrays using modular optical elements

Asaad Kaadan, Hazem Refai & Peter LoPresti
Detecting two light beams in a flat array. Originally published in Applied Optics on 20 June 2016 (ao-55-18-4791)

Visualization 3: Wide-area and omnidirectional optical detector arrays using modular optical elements

Asaad Kaadan, Hazem Refai & Peter LoPresti
Active detection and tracking in a flat array. Originally published in Applied Optics on 20 June 2016 (ao-55-18-4791)

Visualization 3: Wide-area and omnidirectional optical detector arrays using modular optical elements

Asaad Kaadan, Hazem Refai & Peter LoPresti
Active detection and tracking in a flat array. Originally published in Applied Optics on 20 June 2016 (ao-55-18-4791)

Visualization 2: Wide-area and omnidirectional optical detector arrays using modular optical elements

Asaad Kaadan, Hazem Refai & Peter LoPresti
Equalized passive detection in a flat array. Originally published in Applied Optics on 20 June 2016 (ao-55-18-4791)

Visualization 2: Wide-area and omnidirectional optical detector arrays using modular optical elements

Asaad Kaadan, Hazem Refai & Peter LoPresti
Equalized passive detection in a flat array. Originally published in Applied Optics on 20 June 2016 (ao-55-18-4791)

Visualization 1: Wide-area and omnidirectional optical detector arrays using modular optical elements

Asaad Kaadan, Hazem Refai & Peter LoPresti
Unequalized passive detection in a flat array. Originally published in Applied Optics on 20 June 2016 (ao-55-18-4791)

Visualization 1: Wide-area and omnidirectional optical detector arrays using modular optical elements

Asaad Kaadan, Hazem Refai & Peter LoPresti
Unequalized passive detection in a flat array. Originally published in Applied Optics on 20 June 2016 (ao-55-18-4791)

Automated tracking of temporal displacements of a red blood cell obtained by time-lapse digital holographic microscopy

Inkyu Moon, Faliu Yi & Benjamin Rappaz
Red blood cell (RBC) phase images that are numerically reconstructed by digital holographic microscopy (DHM) can describe the cell structure and dynamics information beneficial for a quantitative analysis of RBCs. However, RBCs investigated with time-lapse DHM undergo temporal displacements when their membranes are loosely attached to the substrate during sedimentation on a glass surface or due to the microscope drift. Therefore, we need to develop a tracking algorithm to localize the same RBC among RBC...

Automated tracking of temporal displacements of a red blood cell obtained by time-lapse digital holographic microscopy

Inkyu Moon, Faliu Yi & Benjamin Rappaz
Red blood cell (RBC) phase images that are numerically reconstructed by digital holographic microscopy (DHM) can describe the cell structure and dynamics information beneficial for a quantitative analysis of RBCs. However, RBCs investigated with time-lapse DHM undergo temporal displacements when their membranes are loosely attached to the substrate during sedimentation on a glass surface or due to the microscope drift. Therefore, we need to develop a tracking algorithm to localize the same RBC among RBC...

Visualization 1: Automated tracking of temporal displacements of a red blood cell obtained by time-lapse digital holographic microscopy

Inkyu Moon, Faliu Yi & Benjamin Rappaz
Time-lapse sequences of the tracked target RBC. OPD images are shown for the RBC from Fig. 5 (window size marked in blue color) for 10 s. Originally published in Applied Optics on 20 January 2016 (ao-55-3-A86)

Visualization 1: Automated tracking of temporal displacements of a red blood cell obtained by time-lapse digital holographic microscopy

Inkyu Moon, Faliu Yi & Benjamin Rappaz
Time-lapse sequences of the tracked target RBC. OPD images are shown for the RBC from Fig. 5 (window size marked in blue color) for 10 s. Originally published in Applied Optics on 20 January 2016 (ao-55-3-A86)

Visualization 2: 3D touchable holographic light-field display

Masahiro Yamaguchi & Ryo Higashida
Experimental demonstration of color 3D touch display. Originally published in Applied Optics on 20 January 2016 (ao-55-3-A178)

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