2,106 Works

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

Molecular mechanisms of infectious diseases; phenotypic accommodation of the pathogen

Peter Arend
The term complementary pathogen may signify a microorganism breaking the normal species barrier by providing molecular acceptors, which are metabolically complementary with the phenotype or species-determining structures of a host, and are completed by these structures, transferred by the phenotype-determining enzymes of the host. Thus, these enzymes katalyze the synthesis of a trans-species, heterologous host-like antigen but have excluded the formation of an antibody against this antigen by the same metabolic step. This principle becomes...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

ABO phenotype-protected reproduction based on human specific α1,2 L-fucosylation as explained by the Bombay type formation

Peter Arend
The metabolic relationships between the formation of the ABO(H) blood group phenotype and human fertility are evident in the rare (Oh) or Bombay blood type, which Charles Darwin would have interpreted as resulting from reduced male fertility in consanguinities, based on the history of his own family, the Darwin/Wedgewood Dynasty. The classic Bombay type occurs with the extremely rare and human specific genotype (h/h; se/se), which (due to point mutations) does not encode the fucosyltransferases...

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    1,236
  • Text
    594
  • Collection
    211
  • Image
    53
  • Other
    12

Publication Year

  • 2017
    444
  • 2016
    777
  • 2015
    435
  • 2014
    450

Registration Year

  • 2017
    441
  • 2016
    1,639
  • 2015
    19
  • 2014
    7

Data Centers

  • 027.7 - Zeitschrift für Bibliothekskultur
    0
  • 4TU.Centre for Research Data
    0
  • Aalborg University Library
    0
  • Acta Biologica Plantarum Agriensis
    0
  • Acta Regionis Rurum
    0
  • ADAMA Web S.L.
    0
  • Adaptive Biotechnologies
    0
  • AERIS - Pôle français de données et services pour l'atmosphère
    0
  • Africa Health Research Institute
    0
  • African Population and Health Research Centre
    0
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
    0
  • Agriculture Victoria
    0
  • Ajakirjad (http://ojs.utlib.ee)
    0
  • Akademie der bildenden Künste Wien
    0
  • Aktionsbündnis Patientensicherheit e.V.
    0
  • Alexander von Humboldt Institut für Internet und Gesellschaft
    0
  • Alfred-Wegener-Institut
    0
  • Alkalmazott Nyelvtudomány
    0
  • Alkalmazott Pszichológia
    0
  • Állatorvostudományi Egyetem
    0
  • Alliance for Crops, Soils, and Environmental Science Societies
    0
  • ALT Proceedings / UB Bern
    0
  • altrelettere
    0
  • Alveo
    0
  • AMA Service GmbH
    0