30 Works

The emerging interventionists of the GCC

Karen Young
There is a shift occurring within the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) in which new regional leaders are emerging, buoyed by a decade of unprecedented wealth generation from the 2000s commodities boom and increased foreign investment. Specifically, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) have emerged as activist states in their interest and willingness to intervene both militarily and financially in the politics of neighbouring Arab states. Contrary to their collective and individual foreign policies of...

Battlefields of the republic: the struggle for public space in Tunisia

Charles Tripp
This paper argues that the Tunisian revolutionary moment of 2011 and its aftermath have opened up spaces that are capable of providing a framework for the agonistic politics associated with democratic possibility. Insurgent public space, an emerging plural public, as well as adversarial contests over the constitution of the republic display features that may help to build ‘conflictual consensus’ as part of a democratic future. These possibilities are constantly being re-enacted by Tunisians whose disagreements...

Designing Politics: the limits of design

Adam Kassa, John Bingham-Hall, Richard Sennett, Hillary Angelo, Tom Dobson, Sarah Bastide, Adriana Cobo Corey, Claudio Sopranzetti, Pushpa Arabindoo, Ludovica Rogers, Mona Sloane, Rodrigo Firmino, Adam Greenfield, Cécile Altaber & Andrew Belfield
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City street data profile on ethnicity, economy and migration: Rookery Road, Birmingham, an ESRC report, December 2015

City street data profile on ethnicity, economy and migration: Narborough Road, Leicester, an ESRC report, December 2015

Tender Loving Care? Purchasing medicines for continuing therapeutic improvement and better health outcomes

Andrew Bonser, Panos Kanavos & David Taylor

Social harmony: an Iraqi perspective

Lukman Faily
This paper examines the three foundational pillars of Iraqi society, culture, state and religion, exploring who has power and who has authority within this framework. It then focuses in detail on each of the requirements for social harmony within Iraq and questions whether nation-building can be done prior to or in parallel with state-building. The paper ends by highlighting solutions for the way forward.

Women, Peace and Security in Iraq: Iraq’s National Action Plan to implement Resolution 1325

Zeynep Kaya
The launch of the Iraqi National Action Plan (INAP) to implement the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 (1325) on Women, Peace and Security (WPS) in 2014 is a significant step towards enabling women’s participation and protection in the processes of conflict resolution and peace-building in Iraq. Iraq’s National Action Plan identifies actions for increasing women’s participation at executive levels, enhancing gender equality in legal documents, removing legislation that violates women’s rights and for preventing...

The AKP and Turkish foreign policy in the Middle East

Zeynep Kaya
The first set of papers presented here elaborate on why the AKP has been able to consolidate its domestic power and authority and to generate a somewhat non-resisting public opinion towards its domestic and regional policies. In this context, the government has managed to develop strategies that do not pay lip service to or take into account opposing views and critical interest groups, internally and externally. Güneş Murat Tezcür explains the historical and contemporary trends...

Syria-Iraq relations: state construction and deconstruction and the MENA state system

Raymond Hinnebusch
This paper examines Syria-Iraq relations in order to explore wider issues of regional politics. It presents an overview of the historical stages in relations between the two countries since their formation, with the aim of using their changing relations as indicators of changes in both regional states and in the regional states system. The paper argues that state formation in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) has followed a bell-shaped curve, first rising, then...

Theorising revolution, apprehending civil war: leftist political practice and analysis in Lebanon (1969–79)

Fadi Bardawil
In the wake of the Arab popular uprisings, this short piece revisits the thought of an earlier generation of revolutionaries. Unlike those today, who are united by the desire to overthrow authoritarian regimes but who come from competing ideological universes and conceptions of the political, this earlier generation of militants grounded political practice in a thick Marxist theoretical language. This paper focuses on the writings of Waddah Charara as well as the Marxist tradition of...

Is it always good to be King? Saudi regime resilience after the 2011 Arab popular uprisings

Al-Rasheed Madawi
Although all Arab monarchies (Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries, Jordan and Morocco) witnessed varying degrees of mass protest during the Arab uprisings of 2011, none of the kings and princes has thus far been deposed. The kingdom of Saudi Arabia saw pockets of sporadic protest in many cities in the early months of 2011, but those failed to evolve into a mass protest movement across the country. This paper analyses the conditions that helped maintain...

City street data profile on ethnicity, economy and migration: Stapleton Road, Bristol, an ESRC report, December 2015

City street data profile on ethnicity, economy and migration: Cheetham Hill, Manchester, an ESRC report, December 2015

Trends in contemporary conscious music in Iran

Malihe Maghazei
This paper studies the growing trends in conscious music in Iran, which emerged in the 1990s. It provides a brief historical overview of changes in conscious music in Iran since the Constitutional Revolution of 1905. Within the context of the current status of music in the country, the research then focuses on three conscious trends: rock, fusion and classical Persian music. This music, which is part of a broader intellectual and artistic wave, represents the...

Rentier Islamism: the role of the Muslim Brotherhood in the Gulf

Courtney Freer
Too often political discussion of oil-wealthy states like Kuwait, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) becomes centred on the means in which their economic largesse facilitates political quiescence. While rulers of these states, which I dub ‘super-rentiers’ due to their massive oil and gas wealth, have at times used their riches as a means of buying good will from their citizenries, they cannot and have not completely deterred independent political actors. Of these, ideological...

Will the real Palestinian peasantry please sit down? Towards a new history of British rule in Palestine, 1917-1936

Charles Anderson
This paper surveys the history of peasant and rural resistance to colonial rule, policies, and law in British Palestine before 1936. Although the Arab countryside and its inhabitants have often received minimal or dismissive treatment in much of the scholarly literature, the study argues that rural Arab struggles against political, social and economic dispossession were integral to the history of British Palestine. Peasant agency and unrest broadly shaped relations between the Arab population and the...

منظور عراقي الوئام االجتماعي

Lukman Faily
This paper examines the three foundational pillars of Iraqi society, culture, state and religion, exploring who has power and who has authority within this framework. It then focuses in detail on each of the requirements for social harmony within Iraq and questions whether nation-building can be done prior to or in parallel with state-building. The paper ends by highlighting solutions for the way forward.

The uprising of the marginalised: a socio-economic perspective of the Syrian uprising

Shamel Azmeh
More than three years after the outbreak of protests in a number of Arab countries, the role of socio-economic factors in these events is attracting more attention. One of the cases that needs more research is Syria. More than three years into the Syrian uprising, the socio-economic roots of the protest movement that became one of the bloodiest civil conflicts in the history of the Middle East need to be examined. While it has been...

Social movements and the question of organisation: Egypt and everywhere

Maha Abdelrahman
This paper considers the nature of activism and revolutionary process in the 21st century by examining some of the dilemmas involved in the case of Egypt. It argues that the characteristics of horizontal networks of activism, especially the absence of centralised organisational structures, although well suited to the phase of mass protests in the lead-up to the ousting of Mubarak, can pose a challenge to the prospects of long-term revolutionary projects.

New trends of women’s activism after the Arab uprisings: redefining women's leadership

Aitemad Muhanna-Matar
This paper considers the nature of activism and revolutionary process in the 21st century by examining some of the dilemmas involved in the case of Egypt. It argues that the characteristics of horizontal networks of activism, especially the absence of centralised organisational structures, although well suited to the phase of mass protests in the lead-up to the ousting of Mubarak, can pose a challenge to the prospects of long-term revolutionary projects.

Moroccan national media: between change and status quo

Fatima El Issawi
The pro-democracy protests of the Moroccan Spring provided the national media with an open season that could not last long. Then, entrenched ‘untouchable’ topics were debated in the public realm, including those related to the King’s centralised power; today, journalists work in a climate of control over the media fuelled by anti-terrorism slogans and the popularisation of the model of the journalist as defender of the status quo, in the name of ‘patriotism’. The Moroccan...

Political economy and social movement theory perspectives on the Tunisian and Egyptian uprisings of 2011

Joel Beinin
Workers’ movements contributed substantially to the 2011 popular uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt, Morocco and Bahrain. Comparing the role of workers before, during and after the uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt demonstrates that the relatively successful installation of a procedural democracy in Tunisia owes a great deal to the movements of workers and the unemployed in the uprisings and to their organisational structure and political horizon. Tunisian workers could compel the Tunisian General Federation of Labor...

The Syrian refugee crisis in Lebanon: state fragility and social resilience

Filippo Dionigi
This report provides an account of Syrian refugees in Lebanon in five sections. Firstly, it offers an account of the unfolding of the crisis from the perspective of Lebanese political institutions. Secondly, it maps political reactions to the crisis, focussing on the main actors involved. Thirdly, it analyses the status of Syrians displaced in Lebanon – displacement being one of the main sources of vulnerability. Fourthly, it highlights the role played by local administrations and...

The use of Real World Evidence in the European context: An analysis of key expert opinion

Jennifer Gill, Bernard Avouac, Robert Duncombe, John Hutton, Karina Jahnz-Rozyk, Wolfgang Schramm, Federico Spandonaro, Michael Thomas & Panos Kanavos
Randomised controlled trials (RCT), traditionally seen as the gold standard in drug approval requirement terms, are becoming more difficult due to, among other reasons, budget constraints, increasing complexities and the shrinking of patient populations. Real world evidence (RWE), data used for decision making that is not derived from traditional RCT, may in future play an increasing role in market access and reimbursement decisions. This paper analyses key pricing and reimbursement stakeholders’ opinions of RWE across...

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