67 Works

Signatures of Environmental Adaptation During Range Expansion of Wild Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

Paul Gepts
Landscape genomics integrates population genetics with landscape ecology, allowing the identification of putative molecular determinants involved in environmental adaptation across the natural geographic and ecological range of populations. Wild Phaseolus vulgaris, the progenitor of common bean (P. vulgaris), has a remarkably extended distribution over 10,000 km from northern Mexico to northwestern Argentina. Earlier research has shown that this distribution represents a range expansion from Mesoamerica to the southern Andes through several discrete migration events and...

Penn World Table 9.1

Robert Inklaar Robert C. Feenstra

Bacteria isolated from bengal cat (Felis catus × Prionailurus bengalensis) anal sac secretions produce volatile compounds associated with animal signaling

Mei Yamaguchi, Guillaume Jospin, Holly Ganz, David Coil, Jonathan Eisen, Adrienne Cho, Thant Zaw, Mitchell McCartney & Cristina Davis
Anal sacs are an important odor producing organ found across the mammalian Order Carnivora. Secretions from the anal sac may be used as chemical signals by animals for behaviors ranging from defense to species recognition to signaling reproductive status. In addition, a recent study suggests that domestic cats utilize short-chain free fatty acids in anal sac secretions for individual recognition. The fermentation hypothesis is the idea that symbiotic microorganisms living in association with animals contribute...

Bark characteristics affect epiphytic bryophyte cover across tree species

Devan Becker, Alistair Dobson & Kristen Klitgaard
Forest tree communities are shifting as a result of changes in regional climate and human management, which has cascading effects on other members of the community such as epiphytic bryophytes. Epiphytic bryophytes play important roles in ecosystem function, and their distribution is highly dependent on the characteristics of their substrate. To see how epiphytic substrate characteristics affect bryophyte abundance, we measured bark thickness, pH, and water holding capacity as it varied with bryophyte coverage on...

Measurements from the Fire Influence on Regional and Global Environments Experiment (FIREX) Fire Lab Mini Chamber Experiment

Christopher Cappa, Christopher Lim, David Hagan & Jesse Kroll
All experiments were conducted during the Fire Influence on Regional to Global Environments Experiment (FIREX) lab study, which took place at the Missoula Fire Sciences Lab in Missoula, MT, USA during November, 2016. Experiments focused on refining our understanding of emissions and short timescale processing. The focus was on measuring fuels or combustion conditions that are characteristic of the western U.S. that may be under-sampled by the fire research community. Numerous types of biomass were...

Impacts of fire suppression and drought stress on patterns of conifer mortality in eastern Sierra Nevada montane forest

Josh Brandt, John Laux, & Benjamin Weaver
In the age of fire suppression, a major killer of coniferous forests has shifted from wildfires to beetle infestations and drought stress. We examined a conifer forest in the Eastern Sierra Nevada to obtain demographic data on the area and to determine the factors affecting conifer mortality. We found a positive relationship between the number of boreholes and mortality across tree species. Bark beetle tree mortality in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) was related to density,...

Herbivory defense and growth tradeoffs along a moisture gradient in Lupinus latifolius var. columbianus

Lilly Boiton, James Powers & Jordan Waits
Hypotheses such as the plant stress hypothesis, apparency theory, and the resource availability hypothesis provide contrasting predictions to how plants respond to abiotic stress and their interactions with herbivores. In this paper we examined the effects of a water availability gradient on the morphological characteristics and herbivory of Lupinus latifolius var. columbianus. We measured the abundance of the leaf beetle, Galeruca rudis, and Aphididae as well as the amount of leaf herbivory damage on lupine...

Data from: Evolution of sexually dimorphic pheromone profiles coincides with increased number of male-specific chemosensory organs in Drosophila prolongata

Yige Luo, Yuewei Zhang, Jean-Pierre Farine, Jean-François Ferveur, Santiago Ramírez & Artyom Kopp
Binary communication systems that involve sex-specific signaling and sex-specific signal perception play a key role in sexual selection and in the evolution of sexually dimorphic traits. The driving forces and genetic changes underlying such traits can be investigated in systems where sex-specific signaling and perception have emerged recently and show evidence of potential coevolution. A promising model is found in Drosophila prolongata, which exhibits a species-specific increase in the number of male chemosensory bristles. We...

One-dimensional models of radiation transfer in heterogeneous canopies: a review, re-evaluation, and improved model

Brian Bailey, María Ponce De León & E. Scott Krayenhoff
This dataset contains the project files and data output for the publication: Bailey, Brian; Ponce de León, María; Krayenhoff, E. Scott (2019), One-dimensional models of radiation transfer in heterogeneous canopies: A review, re-evaluation, and improved model. The file main.cpp contains the main program that sets up and runs the simulations. Output files are stored in the 'output' directory. The current version of the Helios source code can be downloaded at https://www.github.com/PlantSimulationLab/Helios

Data from: Anthropogenic Basin Closure and Groundwater Salinization (ABCSAL)

Richard Pauloo
Global food systems rely on irrigated agriculture, and most of these systems in turn depend on fresh sources of groundwater. In this study, we demonstrate that groundwater development, even without overdraft, can transform a fresh, open basin into an evaporation dominated, closed-basin system, such that most of the groundwater, rather than exiting via stream baseflow and lateral subsurface flow, exits predominantly by evapotranspiration from irrigated lands. In these newly closed hydrologic basins, just as in...

Genome Synteny Has Been Conserved Among the Octoploid Progenitors of Cultivated Strawberry Over Millions of Years of Evolution

Michael Hardigan, Mitchell Feldmann, Anne Lorant, Kevin Bird, Steven Knapp, Patrick Edger, Glenn Cole, Charlotte Acharya & Randi Famula
Allo-octoploid cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) originated through a combination of polyploid and homoploid hybridization, domestication of an interspecific hybrid lineage, and continued admixture of wild species over the last 300 years. While genes appear to flow freely between the octoploid progenitors, the genome structures and diversity of the octoploid species remain poorly understood. The complexity and absence of an octoploid genome frustrated early efforts to study chromosome evolution, resolve subgenomic structure, and develop a...

Exploring the role of attitude in the acceptance of self-driving shuttles

YAN XING, Susan Handy, Giovanni Circella, Yunshi Wang & Farzad Alemi
Self-driving vehicles, as a revolution in mobility, are emerging and developing rapidly. However, public attitudes toward this new unproven technology are still uncertain. Given the significant influence of attitude toward a new technology on the intention to use it, the question arises as to why some people are in favor of this technology whereas others are not. Additionally, questions about the key attitudes influencing self-driving technology acceptance, where these attitudes come from, and how they...

Seed preference in a desert harvester ant, Messor pergandei

Tonia Brito-Bersi, Emily Dawes, Richard Martinez & Alexander McDonald
Optimal foraging theory states that foragers maximize their energy intake by minimizing the energy expended to collect their food. The harvester ant, Messor pergandei, provides a model system to study foraging energy expenditure due to their dependable group foraging behavior. Exploring seed preference could give us further insight into how their harvesting affects the surrounding vegetation and ecosystem as a whole. Choice trials were conducted on M. pergandei using three native seeds and one non-native...

Competition between exotic honey bees (Apis mellifera) and native pollinators on late-blooming desert scrub

Janelle M. Osteen, Alexis M. Necarsulmer, Jessica J. Fan Brown & Nhung H. Nguyen
Pollinators are essential to worldwide biodiversity. This study focuses on pollinator communities on Isocoma acradenia, a late blooming shrub in the Colorado desert. We hypothesize that late in the flowering season, exotic honey bees and native pollinators experience increased competition for floral resources. We surveyed pollinator species richness, abundance, and competitive interactions. Our results reveal that honey bee presence does not have effects, competitive or otherwise, on native pollinators. Continuing to research exotic and native...

Plant morphology and behavior of Simmondsia chinensis in the Colorado Desert

Sarah Eskander, Kayla M. Kettmann, Jeramy Ott & Sarah Payne
At the edges of its range in the Colorado Desert, jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) has been known to exhibit local morphological adaptations not found elsewhere in its distribution. In this study, we expand upon jojoba’s known sexually dimorphic adaptations and examine its behavioral adaptations to a xeric environment. Specifically, we investigate how jojoba avoids intense solar radiation through leaf orientation. We found that jojoba does not exhibit paraheliotropic leaf tracking but instead orients its leaves to...

Is the USDA core collection of common bean representative of genetic diversity of the species, as assessed by SNP diversity?

Paul Gepts, Saarah Kuzay & Paige Hamilton
Core collections are envisioned to be a representative subset of larger germplasm collections. They were introduced to facilitate the characterization and use of these germplasm collections. The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) core collection of the USDA Western Regional Plant Introduction Station was one of the first ones to be established in the early 1990s. Here, we evaluate the representativity of this common bean collection in light of the availability of a SNP platform and new...

Supporting data for the manuscript: Observations and modeling of the surface seiches of Lake Tahoe, USA

Derek Roberts, S. Geoffrey Schladow & Alexander Forrest
This data set was created to make the data associated with the manuscript Observations and modeling of the surface seiches of Lake Tahoe, USA, accepted for publication in Aquatic Sciences, publically available per journal convention. The publication abstract is shown below: A rich array of spatially complex surface seiche modes exists in lakes. While the amplitude of these oscillations is often small, knowledge of their spatio-temporal characteristics is valuable for understanding when they might be...

Effect of Drought Stress on the Genetic Architecture of Photosynthate Allocation and Remobilization in Pods of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), a Key Species for Food Security

Paul Gepts, Jorge Carlos Berny Mier Y Teran, Enéas R. Konzen, Antonia Palkovic, Siu M. Tsai, Idupulapati M. Rao & Stephen Beebe
Background: Common bean is the most important staple grain legume for direct human consumption and nutrition. It complements major sources of carbohydrates, including cereals, root crop, or plantain, as a source of dietary proteins. It is also a significant source of vitamins and minerals like iron and zinc. To fully play its nutritional role, however, its robustness against stresses needs to be strengthened. Foremost among these is drought, which commonly affects its productivity and seed...

Succession and soil development of Pleistocene glacial remnants in a sagebrush steppe

Sophie Borison, Charlotte Bruggeman & Sam Steuart
Following glacial retreat, soils and plant communities often undergo drastic changes as succession occurs. As bare soil is colonized, the plant community shifts and drives future succession patterns. The aim of this study was to assess the modern stage of succession on different-aged glaciated areas by sampling a Tahoe-era glaciation (130 to 70 ka) lateral moraine, a Tioga-era glaciation (28 to 13 ka) lateral moraine, a flat which the Tahoe-era glacier covered, and a flat...

Low coverage whole genomes of Calypte anna across California, USA

Nicole Adams, Ruta Bandivadekar, Michael Clark, Lisa Tell & Rachael Bay
Recently, it was suggested that North America has lost nearly 30% of its avifauna since the 1970s. To mitigate such avian population declines, many birds in California are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and California Fish and Game Code. Avian presence, therefore, at Caltrans infrastructure projects, especially bridge construction, has caused costly delays. To avoid this conflict and understand population-specific migration and nesting patterns, we used Anna’s hummingbird, Calypte anna, (a species whose...

Genital morphology and the mechanics of copulation in the millipede genus Pseudopolydesmus (Diplopoda: Polydesmida: Polydesmidae)

Xavier Zahnle, Petra Sierwald, Stephanie Ware & Jason Bond
Mate choice, copulation, genital morphology, and sperm storage are not very well understood in millipedes. The use of three-dimensional x-ray computed tomography (µCT) provides new morphological data regarding millipede reproductive systems in both the female and male, including chitinous sclerites and membranes, muscles, glands, oviducts, and sperm conduits. Here we present a complete integrated account of the morphology and function of the female genital organs in the family Polydesmidae (Diplopoda: Polydesmida) using µCT, UV fluorescence...

Employee airline travel preferences survey data, UC Davis GreenFLY project

Annamaria Amenta & Angela Sanguinetti
This survey data is from a study exploring the potential to promote lower-emissions air travel by providing consumers with information about the carbon emissions of possible flight choices in the context of online flight search and booking. We surveyed over 450 faculty, researchers, and staff at the University of California, Davis, and asked them to choose among hypothetical flight options for a domestic and an international university-related business trip. Emissions estimates for different flight alternatives...

Domestic Well Vulnerability to Drought Duration and Unsustainable Groundwater Management in California's Central Valley

Richard Pauloo, Helen Dahlke, Graham Fogg, Herve Guillon, Amanda Fencl & Alvar Escriva-Bou
Millions of Californians access drinking water via domestic wells, which are vulnerable to drought and unsustainable groundwater management. Groundwater overdraft and the possibility of longer drought duration under climate change threatens domestic well reliability, yet we lack tools to assess the impact of such events. Here, we leverage 943,469 well completion reports and 20 years of groundwater elevation data to develop a spatially-explicit domestic well failure model covering California's Central Valley. Our model successfully reproduces...

Bicycling comfort video experiment

Dillon Fitch, Jane Carlen & Susan Handy
This tabular data can be used to evaluate perceived bicycling comfort on distinct state highways in California. The highway settings are primarily urban, but vary in traffic conditions, lane configurations, speeds, and bicycling infrastructure. The data include survey responses to video clips of these state highways along with a series of additional survey data that co-varies with the video survey responses.

Accuracy of genomic selection and long-term genetic gain for resistance to Verticillium wilt in a genetically diverse strawberry population

Steven Knapp, Dominique Pincot, Michael Hardigan, Glenn Cole, Peter Henry, Thomas Gordon & Randi Famula
Verticillium wilt, a soil-borne disease caused by the fungal pathogen Verticillium dahliae, threatens strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) production worldwide. The development of resistant cultivars has been a challenge since the disease was first reported on strawberry in the early 1900s. The empirical evidence suggests that genetic gains have not been negligible and that the genetics of resistance to this pathogen is quantitative. While resistant cultivars have been developed, a comparatively small percentage are highly resistant,...

Registration Year

  • 2019
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Resource Types

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  • Text
    27

Affiliations

  • University of California, Davis
    38
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    2
  • University of Sao Paulo
    2
  • California Lutheran University
    2
  • University of Washington
    1
  • University of Eastern Finland
    1
  • Washington State University Vancouver
    1
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    1
  • Turku PET Centre
    1
  • Los Alamos National Laboratory
    1