233 Works

Magie en wetenschap in de spektakelcultuur van de negentiende eeuw: Henri Robin in de Lage Landen

Kurt Vanhoutte & Nele Wynants
Magic and Science in the Nineteenth-century Culture of Spectacle: Henri Robin in the Low Countries The theatre of modernity served to illuminate scientific insight and discovery in a spectacular way. Astronomy, physics, and experiments with electricity were at the heart of a popular genre that became known as ‘physiques amusantes’ (amusing physics). These shows occupied a middle ground between entertainment and science, between showing and doing. They were often staged by magicians, who presented themselves...

Digital Humanities and Media History

Huub Wijfjes
Digital humanities is an important challenge for more traditional humanities disciplines to take on, but advanced digital methods for analysis are not often used to answer concrete research questions in these disciplines. This article makes use of extensive digital collections of historical newspapers to discuss the promising, yet challenging relationship between digital humanities and historical research. The search for long-term patterns in digital historical research appropriately positions itself within previous approaches to historical research, but...

TV on the Radio/ Radio on Television

Alexander Badenoch & Berber Hagedoorn
Radio is only to a limited extent a ‘blind medium’. Visual and material aspects have long played a role in the way the medium has acquired meaning. While print has become a common source for radio history, audiovisual material – such as is preserved on the EUscreen portal with extensive metadata and potential for context – offers potential not just for understanding the evolution of television, but rather the entire mass-media ensemble. This article explores...

Rising Star: a Game-Changing Format in a Dying Genre

Merav Schiffmann
In the TV industry everyone is constantly searching for ‘the next big hit.’ For a brief moment in time, Rising Star perfectly fit this description. Within days of the Israeli launch of the first season, the format had already sold internationally to major territories. Rising Star boasted a first of its kind audience participation and a real-time live experience. This caught the attention of producers, executives and creators everywhere. This was a game-changing concept, set...

Big Data Histories: An Introduction

Karin Van Es & Eef Masson
Editorial for TMG 2018-2.

Did Grace Kelly Shed a Tear?

John Ellis
Early television reveals the radical nature of the new medium as well as many of its affordances thatwere later rejected. The coverage of the Monegasque Royal Wedding of Prince Rainier of Monaco and GraceKelly exposes the differences between cinema newsreels and live TV, and how, even at a public event, TVcould invade the personal space of its subjects. Like a detective, the author reconstructs how this historicalevent was covered by film and TV, and how...

Convergent Television and ‘Audience Participation’

Vivi Theodoropoulou
The paper focuses on the introduction of interactive digital television (DTV) in the UK at the turn of the millennium, and its take-up and use by early audiences. It discusses whether the processes of television technological convergence went together with ‘consumer behaviour convergence,’1 enhanced audience engagement with the interactive TV services offered, and participation. Based on findings from a UK-wide survey and in-depth interviews with early Sky digital subscribers conducted during the early days of...

Film Distribution in Occupied Belgium (1940–1944): German Film Politics and its Implementation by the ‘Corporate’ Organisations and the Film Guild

Roel Vande Winkel
The military successes achieved by the Wehrmacht in the first years of World War II, provided Nazi Germany with the opportunity to realise a long-dormant ambition of cultural hegemony. This article, focusing on film distribution in German-occupied Belgium (1940–1944), investigates the concrete steps that were taken to bring this new cultural order into practice and identifies the obstacles the German Propaganda Division (‘Propaganda-Abteilung Belgien’) encountered. Through various measures, the number of Belgian film distributors, and...

Television as a Hybrid Repertoire of Memory

Berber Hagedoorn
In this article, television is reconsidered as a hybrid ‘repertoire’ ofmemory. It is demonstrated how new dynamic production and scheduling practicesin connection with highly accessible and participatory forms of user engagementoffer opportunities for television users to engage with the past, and how suchpractices affect television as a practice of memory. The media platform HollandDoc is discussed as a principal casestudy. By adopting and expanding Aleida Assmann’s model of the dynamics ofcultural memory between remembering and...

Making Sense of the Data-driven: SETUP’s Algorithmic History Museum and Its Relevance for Contemporary Reflection

Maranke Wieringa
Review of The Algorithmic History Museum, an installation created by SETUP. It was on display at the Dutch Design Week 2017 (21– 29 October 2017, Eindhoven, the Netherlands).

Images of Occupation in Dutch Film

Chris Vos
Review of: Wendy Burke. Images of Occupation in Dutch Film. Memory, Myth and the Cultural Legacy of War. Amsterdam University Press, 2017, 262 pp.

The sonic heritage of ecosystems

David Monacchi
This paper discusses the importance of the ‘paleo- soundscapes’ of remote natural habitats as unique footprints of the systemic behaviour of healthy ecosystems and proposes considering them as intangible heritage to be urgently recorded and preserved. The interdisciplinary project Fragments of Extinction has worked toward preserving that ecological heritage through multidimensional sound recording eldwork in primary equatorial rainforests since 2002. The soundscapes of these unique, untouched and undisturbed places – increasingly threatened by human pressure...

Editorial

Juan Francisco Gutiérrez Lozano, Andrea Esser & John Ellis
Editorial to the issue on "TV Formats and Format Research: Theory, methodology, history and new developments." During the last 15 years format research has grown into a notable, distinct field of academic investigation alongside the dramatic expansion of the trade in TV formats. This special issue of VIEW builds on existing format scholarship to deepen our understanding of the history and the continuing growth of the TV format business from a European perspective

Approaches to Spatial Analysis in a Local Cinema History Research

Terézia Porubčanská
In a growing interest in spatial visualisation of historical data emphasized within the field of the new cinema history, identifying the methodologies, their benefits as well as obstacles, is crucial for the development of optimal approaches to the research of the past of the local film culture. The main goal of this paper is to introduce several possibilities of treatment of historical data in a geospatial context. On the case study on the local cinema...

Data-Based Art, Algorithmic Poetry: Geert Mul in Conversation with Eef Masson

Geert Mul & Eef Masson
The award-winning media artist Geert Mul (the Netherlands, 1965) has been making computer based artworks for over twenty-five years. A large portion of his oeuvre, and his more recent work in particular, relies heavily on existing images, often sourced online. With the help of image analysis software, Mul reworks the pictures into new combinations, attracted by the unexpected results that algorithmic operations produce, and the revelatory potential they hold. The artist refers to this work...

What Is Not in the Archive

Jasmijn Van Gorp & Rosita Kiewik
This article discusses the pedagogy and outcome of a new assignment we introduced in the course ‘Television History Online’ at Utrecht University. We assigned the students the task to build a canon of a genre of Dutch television and create a video poster on the EUscreen portal consisting of clips that represent part of their canon. In our pedagogy, we argue that it is important to draw students’ attention to what is missing in the...

Bringing the Multiplex to Antwerp: A Battle of Two Giants

Kathleen Lotze
This article investigates the introduction of the first multiplex in Antwerp, Belgium. Within Europe, Belgium has traditionally been a leader in multiplex developments. Despite Antwerp’s powerful position in terms of national film exhibition and distribution, the city’s first multiplex arrived relatively late. By investigating the struggles of two major exhibitors in the late 1980s and early 1990s, this case of Antwerp connects to findings for other countries (particularly the UK and the US) concerning the...

‘On the Road Again’

Andreas Fickers, Andy O’Dwyer & Alexandre Germain
This video documents the authors' journey back to the origins of transnational television in Europe. Inspired by the idea of experimental media archaeology (EMA), the trip to original locations of the transnational media event known as ‘Paris-week’ in 1952 illustrates a new approach to media historiography, which aims to sensitize television historians for the material remains, topography and physical spaces of early television transmissions. Readers /viewers are invited to watch the different episodes of the...

Scratch's Third Body

Leo Goldsmith
Emerging in the UK in the 1980s, Scratch Video established a paradoxical union of mass-media critique, Left-wing politics, and music-video and advertising aesthetics with its use of moving-image appropriation in the medium of videotape. Enabled by innovative professional and consumer video technologies, artists like George Barber, The Gorilla Tapes, and Sandra Goldbacher and Kim Flitcroft deployed a style characterized by the rapid sampling and manipulation of dissociated images drawn from broadcast television. Inspired by the...

"It's Just So Hard to Bring It to Mind"

Hazel Collie
Memory is theorised as constructive and unreliable, while television has been characterised as forgettable and guilty of undermining memory. In a recent series of oral history interviews I asked British women of different generations to tell me their memories of television in the period 1947 to 1989. This article presents some of their memories to demonstrate how, far from undermining memory, television is used a type of memory text for particular life stages.

Multiscreening and Social TV

Alberto Marinelli & Romana Andò
The explosive growth of handheld screen devices has fostered the emergence of new TV consumption practices: “always connected while watching TV” is the expression that best summarizes this transformation. On the one hand, we observe multiscreening practices engendered by the availability of second screen devices, which people use both simultaneously and sequentially while watching. On the other hand, these handheld devices are strengthening the social dimension of the TV-watching experience (Social TV). This paper aims...

Trust in Techno-images: Early Media Collections as Precursors of Big Data

Frank Kessler & Mirko Tobias Schäfer
This article proposes a consideration of today’s discourses on ‘big data’ from a media archaeological point of view, confronting such discourses with those surrounding projects for large- scale image archives in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Collections of photographs, stereographs and films were thought of as trustworthy and unbiased documents, that allowed for the production of new forms of knowledge. The expectations as to the impact of such new media that circulated at the...

I’m Sorry I Don’t Have a Story

Adrian Miles
I don’t know what this is, which is a strange place from which to begin. This is unsettling, for as an academic I am trained and acculturated to displaying a certainty of manner — a certainty that many of my students and conference colleagues would attest I have down pat. It begins from Bristol. It begins from Alisa Lebow’s presentation at the 2016 i–Docs conference about her interactive documentary Filming Revolution. It begins from what...

Critically Acclaimed and Cancelled

Michael L. Wayne
This article uses The Bridge (FX, 2013–2014), an adaptation of the Danish-Swedish series Broen/Bron (SVT1/DR1, 2011-), to explore the ways in which the brand identities of channels shape the adaptation process for scripted television formats. By situating The Bridge in the broader context of FX’s effort to maintain a coherent brand identity, the author argues that producers were not attempting to repurpose Broen/Bron’s narrative for the American audience. Rather, the network wanted to provide its...

TV Goes Social

Luca Barra & Massimo Scaglioni
In recent years, the Italian television scenario has become fully convergent, and social TV is an activity – and a hip buzzword – indicating both a rich set of possibilities for the audience to engage with TV shows, and an important asset developed by the television industry to provide such engagement, with promotional and economic goals. Mainly adopting the perspective of the production cultures of Italian broadcasters, the essay will explore the “Italian way to...

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