265 Works

Using genomic information for management planning of an endangered perennial, Viola uliginosa

Kyung Min Lee, Pertti Ranta, Jarmo Saarikivi, Lado Kutnar, Branko Vreš, Maxim Dzhus, Marko Mutanen & Laura Kvist
Species occupying habitats subjected to frequent natural and/or anthropogenic changes are a challenge for conservation management. We studied one such species, Viola uliginosa, an endangered perennial wetland species typically inhabiting sporadically flooded meadows alongside rivers/lakes. In order to estimate genomic diversity, population structure and history, we sampled five sites in Finland, three in Estonia, and one each in Slovenia, Belarus, and Poland using genomic SNP data with double-digest restriction site associated DNA sequencing (ddRAD-seq). We...

A major locus controls a biologically active pheromone component in Heliconius melpomene

Kelsey Byers, Kathy Darragh, Jamie Musgrove, Diana Abondano Almeida, Sylvia Fernanda Garza, Ian Warren, Pasi Rastas, Marek Kučka, Yingguang Frank Chan, Richard Merrill, Stefan Schulz, W. Owen McMillan & Chris Jiggins
Understanding the production, response, and genetics of signals used in mate choice can inform our understanding of the evolution of both intraspecific mate choice and reproductive isolation. Sex pheromones are important for courtship and mate choice in many insects, but we know relatively little of their role in butterflies. The butterfly Heliconius melpomene uses a complex blend of wing androconial compounds during courtship. Electroantennography in H. melpomene and its close relative H. cydno showed that...

Threats from the air: damselfly predation on diverse prey taxa

Eero J. Vesterinen, Kari Kaunisto, Roslin, Prof. Tomas, Mark Forbes, Andre Morrill, Anna Puisto, Ilari Sääksjärvi, Thomas Lilley & Eero J. Vesterinen
1. To understand the diversity and strength of predation in natural communities, researchers must quantify the total amount of prey species in the diet of predators. Metabarcoding approaches have allowed widespread characterization of predator diets with high taxonomic resolution. To determine the wider impacts of predators, researchers should combine DNA techniques with estimates of population size of predators using mark-release-recapture (MRR) methods, and with accurate metrics of food consumption by individuals. 2. Herein, we estimate...

Data from: Global biogeographic patterns in bipolar moss species

Elisabeth Machteld Biersma, Jennifer A. Jackson, Jaakko Hyvonen, Satu Koskinen, Katrin Linse, Howard Griffiths & Peter Convey
A bipolar disjunction is an extreme, yet common, biogeographic pattern in non-vascular plants, yet its underlying mechanisms (vicariance or long-distance dispersal), origin and timing remain poorly understood. Here, combining a large-scale population dataset and multiple dating analyses, we examine the biogeography of four bipolar Polytrichales mosses, common to the Holarctic (temperate and polar Northern Hemisphere regions) and the Antarctic region (Antarctic, sub-Antarctic, southern South America) and other Southern Hemisphere (SH) regions. Our data reveal contrasting...

Data from: Is evolution predictable? quantitative genetics under complex genotype-phenotype maps

Lisandro Milocco
A fundamental aim of post-genomic 21st century biology is to understand the genotype-phenotype map (GPM) or how specific genetic variation relates to specific phenotypic variation. Quantitative genetics approximates such maps using linear models, and has developed methods to predict the response to selection in a population. The other major field of research concerned with the GPM, developmental evolutionary biology or evo-devo, has found the GPM to be highly nonlinear and complex. Here we quantify how...

Data from: Climate limitation at the cold edge – contrasting perspectives from species distribution modelling and a transplant experiment

Caroline Greiser, Eric Meineri, Miska Luoto, Kristoffer Hylander & Johan Ehrlén
The role of climate in determining range margins is often studied using species distribution models (SDMs), which are easily applied but have well-known limitations, e.g. due to their correlative nature and colonization and extinction time lags. Transplant experiments can give more direct information on environmental effects, but often cover small spatial and temporal scales. We simultaneously applied an SDM using high-resolution spatial predictors and an integral projection (demographic) model based on a transplant experiment at...

Data from: Grey plumage colour is more cryptic than brown in snowy landscapes in a resident colour polymorphic bird

Katja Koskenpato, Aleksi Lehikoinen, Carita Lindstedt & Patrik Karell
Camouflage may promote fitness of given phenotypes in different environments. The tawny owl (Strix aluco) is a colour polymorphic species with a grey and brown morph resident in the Western Palearctic. A strong selection pressure against the brown morph during snowy and cold winters has been documented earlier but the selection mechanisms remain unresolved. Here we hypothesise that selection favors the grey morph because it is better camouflaged against predators and mobbers in snowy conditions...

Data from: Predators’ consumption of unpalatable prey does not vary as a function of bitter taste perception

Liisa Hämäläinen, Johanna Mappes, Rose Thorogood, Janne Valkonen, Kaijamari Karttunen, Tuuli Salmi & Hannah Rowland
Many prey species contain defensive chemicals that are described as tasting bitter. Bitter taste perception is therefore assumed to be important when predators are learning about prey defenses. However, it is not known how individuals differ in their response to bitter taste, and how this influences their foraging decisions. We conducted taste perception assays in which wild-caught great tits (Parus major) were given water with increasing concentrations of bitter-tasting chloroquine diphosphate until they showed an...

Data from: Joint evolution of dispersal and connectivity

Petteri Karisto & Eva Kisdi
Functional connectivity, the realized flow of individuals between the suitable sites of a heterogeneous landscape, is a prime determinant of the maintenance and evolution of populations in fragmented habitats. While a large body of literature examines the evolution of dispersal propensity, it is less known how evolution shapes functional connectivity via traits that influence the distribution of the dispersers. Here we use a simple model to demonstrate that, in a heterogeneous environment with clustered and...

Shared, modular chromosome rearrangements enable parallel adaptation in a marine fish

Tony Kess, Paul Bentzen, Sarah Lehnert, Emma Sylvester, Sigbjørn Lien, Matthew Kent, Marion Sinclair-Waters, Corey Morris, Brendan Wringe, Robert Fairweather & Ian Bradbury
Genomic architecture and standing variation can play a key role in ecological adaptation, and contribute to the predictability of evolution. In Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), four large chromosomal rearrangements have been associated with ecological gradients and migratory behaviour in regional analyses. However, the degree of parallelism , the extent of independent inheritance, and functional distinctiveness of these rearrangements remains poorly understood. Here, we use a 12K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array to demonstrate extensive individual...

Data from "Removal of grazers alters the response of tundra soil carbon to warming and enhanced nitrogen availability", Ecological Monograps in October 2019

Henni Ylänne, Elina Kaarlejärvi, Maria Väisänen, Minna K Männistö, Saija H. K. Ahonen, Johan Olofsson & Sari Stark
Here we present the data used in the manuscript "Removal of grazers alters the response of tundra soil carbon to warming and enhanced nitrogen availability", Ecological Monograps, Early view in October 2019 by H. Ylänne, E. Kaarlejärvi, M. Väisänen, M. K. Männistö, S. H. K. Ahonen, J. Olofsson & S. Stark. In this paper we studied, how five years of experimental warming and increased soil nitrogen availability interact with both long- and short-term differences in...

Estimating uncertainty in divergence times among three-spined stickleback clades using the multispecies coalescent

Bohao Fang, Juha Merilä, Michael Matschiner & Paolo Momigliano
Incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) can lead to biased divergence time estimates. To explore if and how ILS has influenced the results of a recent study of worldwide phylogeny of three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), we estimated divergence times among major clades by applying both a concatenation approach and the multispecies coalescent (MSC) model to single-nucleotide polymorphisms. To further test the influence of different calibration strategies, we applied different calibrations to the root and to younger nodes...

Data from: Long-term demographic surveys reveal a consistent relationship between average occupancy and abundance within local populations of a butterfly metapopulation

Torsti Schulz, Jarno Vanhatalo & Marjo Saastamoinen
Species distribution models are the tool of choice for large-scale population monitoring, environmental association studies, and predictions of range shifts under future environmental conditions. Available data and familiarity of the tools rather than the underlying population dynamics often dictate the choice of specific method — especially for the case of presence–absence data. Yet, for predictive purposes, the relationship between occupancy and abundance embodied in the models should reflect the actual population dynamics of the modelled...

Data from: Effects of marker type and filtering criteria on QST-FST comparisons

Zitong Li, Ari Löytynoja, Antoine Fraimout & Juha Merilä
Comparative studies of quantitative and neutral genetic differentiation (QST-FST tests) provide means to detect adaptive population differentiation. However, QST-FST tests can be overly liberal if the markers used deflate FST below its expectation, or overly conservative if methodological biases lead to inflated FST estimates. We investigated how marker type and filtering criteria for marker selection influence QST-FST comparisons through their effects on FST using simulations and empirical data on over 18 000 in silico genotyped...

Explaining illness with evil: Pathogen prevalence fosters moral vitalism

Brock Bastian, Christin-Melanie Vauclair, Steve Loughnan, Paul Bain, Ashwini Ashokkumar, Maja Becker, Michal Bilewicz, Emma Collier-Baker, Carla Crespo, Paul W. Eastwick, Ronald Fischer, Malte Friese, Ángel Gómez, Valeschka M. Guerra, Jose Luis Castellanos Guevara, Katja Hanke, Nic Hooper, Li-Li Huang, Shi Junqi, Minoru Karasawa, Peter Kuppens, Siri Leknes, Müjde Peker, Cesar Pelay, Afoditi Pina … & William B. Swann
Pathogens represent a significant threat to human health leading to the emergence of strategies designed to help manage their negative impact. We examined how spiritual beliefs developed to explain and predict the devastating effects of pathogens and spread of infectious disease. Analysis of existing data in Studies 1 and 2 suggests that moral vitalism (beliefs about spiritual forces of evil) is higher in geographical regions characterized by historical higher levels of pathogens. Furthermore, drawing on...

Data from: Limited thermal plasticity and geographic divergence in the ovipositor of Drosophila suzukii

Ceferino Varón González, Antoine Fraimout, Arnaud Delapré, Vincent Debat & Raphaël Cornette
Phenotypic plasticity has been repeatedly suggested to facilitate adaptation to new environmental conditions, as in invasions. Here we investigate this possibility by focusing on the worldwide invasion of Drosophila suzukii: an invasive species that has rapidly colonized all continents over the last decade. This species is characterized by a highly developed ovipositor, allowing females to lay eggs through the skin of ripe fruits. Using a novel approach based on the combined use of SEM and...

Data from: Carbon dioxide and methane fluxes from different surface types in a created urban wetland

Xuefei Li, Outi Wahlroos, Sami Haapanala, Jukka Pumpanen, Harri Vasander, Anna Ojala1, Timo Vesala & Ivan Mammarella
Many wetlands have been drained due to urbanization, agriculture, forestry or other purposes, which has resulted in losing their ecosystem services. To protect receiving waters and to achieve services such as flood control and stormwater quality mitigation, new wetlands are created in urbanized areas. However, our knowledge of greenhouse gas exchange in newly created wetlands in urban areas is currently limited. In this paper we present measurements carried out at a created urban wetland in...

Data from: A phylogenomic perspective to diversity, hybridization and evolutionary affinities in the stickleback genus Pungitius

Guo Baocheng, Fang Bohao, Shikano Takahito, Momigliano Paolo, Wang Cui, Kravchenko Alexandra & Merilä Juha
Hybridization and convergent evolution are phenomena of broad interest in evolutionary biology, but their occurrence poses challenges for reconstructing evolutionary affinities among affected taxa. Sticklebacks in the genus Pungitius are a case in point: evolutionary relationships and taxonomic validity of different species and populations in this circumpolarly distributed species complex remain contentious due to convergent evolution of traits regarded as diagnostic in their taxonomy, and possibly also due to frequent hybridization among taxa. To clarify...

Data from: Profile of and risk factors for post-stroke cognitive impairment in diverse ethno-regional groups

Jessica W Lo, John D Crawford, David W Desmond, Olivier Godefroy, Hanna Jokinen, Simin Mahinrad, Hee-Joon Bae, Sebastian Köhler, Elles Douven, Julie Staals, Christopher Chen, Xin Xu, Eddie J Chong, Rufus O Akinyemi, Rajesh N Kalaria, Adesola Ogunniyi, Mélanie Barbay, Martine Roussel, Byung-Chul Lee, Velandai K Srikanth, Christopher Moran, Nagaendran Kandiah, Russell J Chander, Behnam Sabayan, J. Wouter Jukema … & Perminder S Sachdev
OBJECTIVE: To address the variability in prevalence estimates and inconsistencies in potential risk factors for post-stroke cognitive impairment (PSCI) using a standardised approach and individual participant data (IPD) from international cohorts in the STROKOG consortium. METHODS: We harmonised data from thirteen studies based in eight countries. Neuropsychological test scores 2 to 6 months after stroke or TIA and appropriate normative data were used to calculate standardised cognitive domain scores. Domain-specific impairment was based on percentile...

Data from: Breeding bird species diversity across gradients of land use from forest to agriculture in Europe

Matti J. Koivula, Dan E. Chamberlain, Robert J. Fuller, Stephen C. F. Palmer, Attila Bankovics, Fintan Bracken, Tom Bolger, Eduardo De Juana, Marc Montadert, Renato Neves, Rui Rufino, Angel Sallent, Luís Lopes Da Silva, Pedro J. Leitão, Manfred Steffen & Allan D. Watt
Loss, fragmentation and decreasing quality of habitats have been proposed as major threats to biodiversity world-wide, but relatively little is known about biodiversity responses to multiple pressures, particularly at very large spatial scales. We evaluated the relative contributions of four landscape variables (habitat cover, diversity, fragmentation and productivity) in determining different components of avian diversity across Europe. We sampled breeding birds in multiple 1-km2 landscapes, from high forest cover to intensive agricultural land, in eight...

Data from: Comparative support for the expensive tissue hypothesis: big brains are correlated with smaller gut and greater parental investment in Lake Tanganyika cichlids

Masahito Tsuboi, Arild Husby, Alexander Kotrschal, Alexander Hayward, Séverine Denise Büchel, Josefina Zidar, Hanne Løvlie & Niclas Kolm
The brain is one of the most energetically expensive organs in the vertebrate body. Consequently, the energetic requirements of encephalization are suggested to impose considerable constraints on brain size evolution. Three main hypotheses concerning how energetic constraints might affect brain evolution predict covariation between brain investment and i) investment into other costly tissues, ii) overall metabolic rate, and iii) reproductive investment. To date, these hypotheses have mainly been tested in homeothermic animals and the existing...

Data from: Ecological crossovers of sexual signalling in a migratory bird

Pauliina Elisabet Teerikorpi, Päivi Maria Sirkiä & Toni Laaksonen
Environmental shifts may induce sudden reversals in the relative quality or sexual attractiveness of mates (ecological cross-overs) leading to non-directional sexual selection. Studies on such ecological cross-overs induced by environmental shifts during the non-breeding season are particularly rare. We studied the interactive effects between wintering conditions and a male white wing patch on the breeding success of breeding pairs and the local survival of females in a migratory passerine population over a 32-year period. After...

Data from: Phylogenomic insights into the cambrian explosion, the colonization of land and the evolution of flight in arthropoda

Christopher W. Wheat & Niklas Wahlberg
The timing of the origin of arthropods in relation to the Cambrian explosion is still controversial, as are the timing of other arthropod macroevolutionary events such as the colonization of land and the evolution of flight. Here we assess the power of a phylogenomic approach to shed light on these major events in the evolutionary history of life on earth. Analyzing a large phylogenomic dataset (122 taxa, 62 genes) with a Bayesian-relaxed molecular clock, we...

Data from: Environmentally induced dispersal-related life history syndrome in the tropical butterfly, Bicyclus anynana

Marjo Saastamoinen, Paul M. Brakefield, Otso Ovaskainen & O. Ovaskainen
Dispersal is a key process for understanding the persistence of populations as well as the capacity of organisms to respond to environmental change. Therefore understanding factors that may facilitate or constrain the evolution of dispersal is of crucial interest. Assessments of phenotypic variation in various behavioural, physiological and morphological traits related to insect dispersal and flight performance are common, yet very little is known about the genetic associations among these traits. We have used experiments...

Data from: Increasing temperature, not mean temperature, is a cue for avian timing of reproduction

Sonja Verena Schaper, Alistair S. Dawson, Peter J. Sharp, Phillip Gienapp, Samuel P. Caro, Marcel E. Visser, Sonja V. Schaper & Alistair Dawson
Timing of reproduction in temperate zone birds is strongly correlated with spring temperature, with an earlier onset of breeding in warmer years. Females adjust their laying between years to be synchronized with local food sources and thereby optimize reproductive output. However, climate change currently disrupts the link between predictive environmental cues and spring phenology. To investigate direct effects of temperature on the decision to lay, and its genetic basis, we used pairs of Great Tits...

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