133 Works

The Pivotal Position of Henry V in the Rise and Fall of Shakespeare's Prose

Robert Crosman
The essay traces the proportion of prose in Shakespeare’s plays, identifying genre and chronology as the two major variables influencing the rise and fall over time. In his analysis—that offers closer examinations of prose by Falstaff and Young Hal in 1 Henry IV and the prose used by Hal (then King Henry) in his regal role in Henry V, namely in the disguise scene in 4.1 and the wooing of Katherine—he treats prose as entering...

From Paronomasia to Politics in the Poetry of Stevens and Bishop: A Response to Eleanor Cook

Jacqueline Vaught Cook
Jacqueline Vaught Brogan supplements Elizabeth Cook's aesthetic perspective on paronomasia and etymology in the poetry of Wallace Stevens and Elizabeth Bishop with the political implications of their wordplay in general.

The Rest Is Not Silence: A Reply to John Russell Brown

Maurice Charney
Maurice Charney offers his critique of John Russell Brown's quintuple reading of "the Last Moments of Hamlet" (DOI: 10.25623/conn002.1-brown-1).

Paronomasia in the Quip Modest: From Sidney to Herbert

Judith Dundas
Judith Dundas investigates the use of the quip modest in works by Sir Philip Sidney and George Herbert.

The Seasons of the Globe: Two New Studies of Elizabethan Drama and Festival

Thomas Pettitt
Thomas Pettitt's article is a topical double-review concerned with the Elizabethan drama in the light of the festive seasons and theatrical festivals. He reads the topic with François Laroque's Shakespeare's Festive World: Elizabethan Seasonal Entertainment and the Professional Stage (Cambridge: CUP), and Sandra Billington's Mock Kings in Medieval Society and Renaissance Drama (Oxford: Clarendon).

A Comment on Robert Crosman, \"The Pivotal Position of Henry V in the Rise and Fall of Shakespeare's Prose\"

Stanley Hussey
Robert Crosman's article does well to remind us of the importance of Shakespeare's prose, in the history plays as well as in the comedies. Hussey's resonse is less a criticism than a change of emphasis, away from the development of Henry V as shown by his prose style to the exploitation of a variety of styles, often involving a deliberate breach of decorum. His interest is how Shakespeare constantly goes beyond the accepted view that,...

The Head and the Hands on the Rostra: Marcus Tullius Cicero as a Sign of Its Time

Dale B. J. Randall
If one should wonder why Marcus Tullius Cicero was published in 1651, several kinds of suggestive evidence are available. Among these are the auspices under which the work was printed, the turbulent current of discourse into which it was introduced, its Jonsonian connections, and the nature of the exampling to be found within the play itself. The last of these will occupy most of the article's attention here and may prove useful in reading other...

\"M.O.A.I.\" Trying to Share the Joke in Twelfth Night 2.5 (A Critical Hypothesis)

Inge Leimberg
In this article, Inge Leimberg takes on Shakespeare’s Malvolio (Twelfth Night) and his sin of self-love against the backdrop of theology, philosophy and literature contemporary to Shakespeare. On this basis she offers a reading of the the cryptic acronym “M.O.A.I” (voiced four times in the play’s Act II, Scene 5) as an anagram derived from the Book of Revelation 1:18 “I’M A O” to highlight Malvolio’s “ruling passion, self-love.” By drawing on Erasmus, Donne and...

Charles I, Cromwell and Cicero (A Response to Dale B.J. Randall)

John Morrill
In further developing the historical Interregnum context of Markus Tullius Cicero, John Morrill’s response to Dale B. J. Randall asks to consider Fulke Greville, 1st Lord Brooke as the play’s anonymous author (as other scholars did before). For Morrill, this attribution would allow for closer connection of the play to the political situation of 1651, mostly distinctly the Engagement controversy (over the statement of Engagement to Cromwell as being loyal to a Commonwealth “without a...

More About Laughing at \"M.O.A.I.\" (A Response to Inge Leimberg)

John Russell Brown
This is a Response to Inge Leimberg’s essay “‘M.O.A.I.’ Trying to Share the Joke in Twelfth Night 2.5 (A Critical Hypothesis)” (DOI: 10.25623/conn001.1-leimberg-1)

Once More to the Rostra (An Answer to John Morrill)

Dale B. J. Randall
This is a reply to John Morrill’s “Charles I, Cromwell and Cicero,” which was written in response to Dale B. J. Randall’s “The Head and the Hands on the Rostra: Marcus Tullius Cicero as a Sign of Its Times” (DOI: 10.25623/conn01.1-randall-1)

Multiplicity of Meaning in the Last Moments of Hamlet

John Russell Brown
This essay examines ambiguities in Hamlet and argues that wordplay represents the nature of Hamlet's mind, making audiences keenly aware of his inner dissatisfaction and come to expect some unambiguous resolution at the end of the tragedy.

From Etymology to Paronomasia: Wallace Stevens, Elizabeth Bishop, and Others

Eleanor Cook
The article examines the use of paronomasia in the writings of Bishop, Stevens and others.

Actaeon's Dogs in Ovid's Metamorphoses, and the Wolf Pack in Ysengrimus

F. J. Sypher
The essay compares the dogs from the hunting episode in Ovid’s Metamorphoses with the Wolfpack in Ysengrimus.

God’s Mending: Formal and Spiritual Correction in George Herbert’s “Deniall” and Henry Vaughan’s “Disorder and frailty”

Jonathan Nauman
Connotations - A Journal for Critical Debate, ISSN 0939-5482, Vol. 28, p. 113-´28

Self-Imposed Fetters in Four Golden Age Villanelles

Frank Kearful

Learning from Anniversaries: Progress, Particularity, and Radical Empiricism in John Donne's The Second Anniversarie

Netzley Ryan
Connotations - A Journal for Critical Debate, ISSN 0939-5482, Vol. 25.1, p. 19-44

Tennyson’s “Tithonus” and the Revision of Wordsworth’s “Tintern Abbey”

Thomas Jayne
Connotations - A Journal for Critical Debate, ISSN 0939-5482, Vol. 26, p. 141-162

A Response to Judith P. Saunders

Totten Gary
Connotations - A Journal for Critical Debate, ISSN 0939-5482, Vol. 26.1, p. 47-53

Connotations - A Journal for Critical Debate (Vol. 25.2)

Inge Leimberg, Matthias Bauer, Burkhard Niederhoff & Angelika Zirker

Annotation as an Embedded Textual Practice: Analysing Explanatory Notes in Three Editions of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

Lena Linne & Burkhard Niederhoff
Connotations - A Journal for Critical Debate, ISSN 0939-5482, Vol. 29, p. 48-76

Connotations - A Journal for Critical Debate (Vol. 25.1)

Inge Leimberg, Matthias Bauer, Burkhard Niederhoff & Angelika Zirker

“In Another Light”: New Intertexts for David Dabydeen’s “Turner”

Plasa Carl
Connotations - A Journal for Critical Debate, ISSN 0939-5482, Vol. 26, p. 163-203

A Response to Carl Plasa

Hedley Jane
Connotations - A Journal for Critical Debate, ISSN 0939-5482, Vol. 26.1, p. 39-46

Reader Participation and Rationalism in Fielding's Tom Jones

Lothar Černý
Lothar Černý’s article offers a critique of Wolfgang Iser, who developing his theory of reader participation and reader response, chose Fielding’s Tom Jones and Joseph Andrews as his starting point. Fielding’s novels, therefore, do not just serve Iser as examples to illustrate his theory but actually provide the patterns or substrata on which it is based. This inductive method, however sound in itself, requires close attention to what the text says. Černý argues thath Iser’s...

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