Data from: Electrophysiological correlates of semantic dissimilarity reflect the comprehension of natural, narrative speech

Michael P. Broderick, Andrew J. Anderson, Giovanni M. Di Liberto, Michael J. Crosse & Edmund C. Lalor
People routinely hear and understand speech at rates of 120–200 words per minute [1, 2]. Thus, speech comprehension must involve rapid, online neural mechanisms that process words’ meanings in an approximately time-locked fashion. However, in the context of continuous speech, electrophysiological evidence for such time-locked processing has been lacking. Whilst valuable insights into the semantic processing of speech have been provided by the “N400 component” of the event-related potential [3-6], this literature has been dominated...
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