Conspecific and congeneric interactions shape increasing rates of breeding dispersal of northern spotted owls

Julianna Jenkins, Damon Lesmeister, Eric Forsman, Katie Dugger, Steven Ackers, Lawrence Andrews, Scott Gremel, Bruce Hollen, Chris McCafferty, M. Shane Pruett, Janice Reid, Stan Sovern & J. David Wiens
Breeding dispersal, the movement from one breeding territory to another, is rare for philopatric species that evolved within relatively stable environments, such as the old-growth coniferous forests of the Pacific Northwest. While dispersal is not inherently maladaptive, the consequences of increased dispersal on population dynamics in populations whose historical dispersal rates are low could be significant, particularly for a declining species. We examined rates and possible causes of breeding dispersal based on a sample of...
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