The loss of the ‘pelvic step’ in human evolution

Nathan Thompson, Danielle Rubinstein, William Parrella-O'Donnell, Matthew Brett, Brigitte Demes, Susan Larson & Matthew O'Neill
Human bipedalism entails relatively short strides compared with facultatively bipedal primates. Unique non-sagittal-plane motions associated with bipedalism may account for part of this discrepancy. Pelvic rotation anteriorly translates the hip, contributing to bipedal stride length (i.e. the ‘pelvic step’). Facultative bipedalism in non-human primates entails much larger pelvic rotation than in humans, suggesting that a larger pelvic step may contribute to their relatively longer strides. We collected data on the pelvic step in bipedal chimpanzees...
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