Data from: Does biological intimacy shape ecological network structure? A test using a brood pollination mutualism on continental and oceanic islands

David H. Hembry, Rafael L. G. Raimundo, Erica A. Newman, Lesje Atkinson, Chang Guo, & Rosemary G. Gillespie
Biological intimacy—the degree of physical proximity or integration of partner taxa during their life cycles—is thought to promote the evolution of reciprocal specialization and modularity in the networks formed by co‐occurring mutualistic species, but this hypothesis has rarely been tested. Here, we test this “biological intimacy hypothesis” by comparing the network architecture of brood pollination mutualisms, in which specialized insects are simultaneously parasites (as larvae) and pollinators (as adults) of their host plants to that...
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