Data from: Severe inbreeding depression and no evidence of purging in an extremely inbred wild species - the Chatham Island black robin

Euan S. Kennedy, Catherine E. Grueber, Richard P. Duncan & Ian G. Jamieson
Although evidence of inbreeding depression in wild populations is well established, the impact of genetic purging in the wild remains controversial. The contrasting effects of inbreeding depression, fixation of deleterious alleles by genetic drift and the purging of deleterious alleles via natural selection mean that predicting fitness outcomes in populations subjected to prolonged bottlenecks is not straightforward. We report results from a long-term pedigree study of arguably the world's most inbred wild species of bird:...
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