Data from: Social behaviour and collective motion in plant-animal worms

Nigel R. Franks, Alan Worley, Katherine A. J. Grant, Alice R. Gorman, Victoria Vizard, Harriet Plackett, Ana Doran Borges De Sousa, Margaret L. Gamble, Martin C. Stumpe, Ana B. Sendova-Franks & Carolina Doran
Social behaviour may enable organisms to occupy ecological niches that would otherwise be unavailable to them. Here we test this major evolutionary principle by demonstrating self-organizing social behaviour in the plant-animal, Symsagittifera roscoffensis. These marine aceol flat worms rely for all of their nutrition on the algae within their bodies: hence their common name. We show that individual worms interact with one another to co-ordinate their movements so that even at low densities they begin...
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