Data from: The chemical basis of a signal of individual identity: Shell pigment concentrations track the unique appearance of Common Murre eggs

Mark E Hauber, Alexander L Bond, Amy-Lee Kouwenberg, Gregory J Robertson, Erpur S Hansen, Mande Holford, Miri Dainson, Alec Luro & James Dale
In group-living species with parental care, the accurate recognition of one’s own young is critical to fitness. Because discriminating offspring within a large colonial group may be challenging, progeny of colonial breeders often display familial or individual identity signals to elicit and receive costly parental provisions from their own parents. For instance, the Common Murre (or Common Guillemot: Uria aalge) is a colonially breeding seabird that does not build a nest and lays and incubates...
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