Data from: Parasite-infected sticklebacks increase the risk-taking behavior of uninfected group members

Nicolle Demandt, Benedikt Saus, Ralf H.J.M. Kurvers, Jens Krause, Joachim Kurtz, Jörn P. Scharsack & Ralf H. J. M. Kurvers
Trophically transmitted parasites frequently increase their hosts' risk-taking behaviour, to facilitate transmission to the next host. Whether such elevated risk-taking can spill over to uninfected group members is, however, unknown. To investigate this, we confronted groups of six three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus, containing 0, 2, 4 or 6 experimentally infected individuals with a simulated bird attack and studied their risk-taking behaviour. As a parasite, we used the tapeworm Schistocephalus solidus, which increases the risk-taking of...
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