Data from: Predator mimicry, not conspicuousness, explains the efficacy of butterfly eyespots

Sebastiano De Bona, Janne K. Valkonen, Andres Lopez-Sepulcre & Johanna Mappes
Large conspicuous eyespots on butterfly wings have been shown to deter predators. This has been traditionally explained by mimicry of vertebrate eyes, but recently the classic eye-mimicry hypothesis has been challenged. It is proposed that the conspicuousness of the eyespot, not mimicry, is what causes aversion due to sensory biases, neophobia or sensory overloads. We conducted an experiment to directly test whether the eye-mimicry or the conspicuousness hypothesis better explain eyespot efficacy. We used great...
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