Data from: Food spoilage, storage, and transport: implications for a sustainable future

Sean T. Hammond, James H. Brown, Joseph R. Burger, Tatiana P. Flanagan, Trevor S. Fristoe, Norman Mercado-Silva, Jeffrey C. Nekola & Jordan G. Okie
Human societies have always faced temporal and spatial fluctuations in food availability. The length of time that food remains edible and nutritious depends on temperature, moisture, and other factors that affect the growth rates of organisms that cause spoilage. Some storage techniques, such as drying, salting, and smoking, date back to ancient hunter–gatherer and early agricultural societies and use relatively low energy inputs. Newer technologies developed since the industrial revolution, such as canning and compressed-gas...
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