Data from: Rapid phenotypic change in a native bird population following conversion of the Colorado Desert to agriculture

Nicholas A. Mason & Philip Unitt
Humans are modifying our planet’s ecosystems with increasing frequency and intensity. Exploring population responses to anthropogenic modifications of natural habitat provides insights into how species persist in the Anthropocene. Here, we leverage natural history collections to document rapid phenotypic change within a native bird population following 80 years of agriculture in the Colorado Desert of southeastern California. By comparing spectrophotometric measurements of Horned Lark (Eremophila alpestris) specimens collected in the Imperial Valley from 1918 to...
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These counts follow the COUNTER Code of Practice, meaning that Internet robots and repeats within a certain time frame are excluded.
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