Connectivity and edge effects increase bee colonization in an experimentally fragmented landscape

Sean Griffin & Nick Haddad
Though landscape corridors increase dispersal of many animals and plants, it remains unknown whether increased dispersal increases colonization and establishment of new populations in connected fragments. Working in experimentally fragmented landscapes, we tested how two aspects of habitat fragments altered by corridors- connectivity and edge-to-area ratio- determine patterns of colonization by a solitary, cavity-nesting bee (Megachile rotundata). We found that though higher connectivity initially increased rates of nest-site occupation, higher edge-to-area ratio ultimately increased patch...
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9 downloads reported since publication in 2021.

These counts follow the COUNTER Code of Practice, meaning that Internet robots and repeats within a certain time frame are excluded.
What does this mean?