Data from: Social living simultaneously increases infection risk and decreases the cost of infection

Vanessa O. Ezenwa, Katherine E.L. Worsley-Tonks & Katherine E. L. Worsley-Tonks
Elevated parasite infection risk is considered to be a near universal cost of social living. However, living in groups may also provide benefits that reduce the negative impacts of infection. These potential ‘tolerance’ benefits of living socially are theoretically possible, but have rarely been described. In this study, we used an anthelmintic treatment experiment in wild Grant’s gazelles (Nanger granti), who are commonly infected with gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN), to show that social living confers both...
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These counts follow the COUNTER Code of Practice, meaning that Internet robots and repeats within a certain time frame are excluded.
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