Data from: When are phylogenetic analyses misled by convergence? A case study in Texas cave salamanders

John J. Wiens, Paul T. Chippindale & David M. Hillis
Convergence, i.e., similarity between organisms that is not the direct result of shared phylogenetic history (and that may instead result from independent adaptations to similar environments), is a fundamental issue that lies at the interface of systematics and evolutionary biology. Although convergence is often cited as an important problem in morphological phylogenetics, there have been few well-documented examples of strongly supported and misleading phylogenetic estimates that result from adaptive convergence in morphology. In this article,...
1 citation reported since publication in 2009.
277 views reported since publication in 2009.

These counts follow the COUNTER Code of Practice, meaning that Internet robots and repeats within a certain time frame are excluded.
What does this mean?
48 downloads reported since publication in 2009.

These counts follow the COUNTER Code of Practice, meaning that Internet robots and repeats within a certain time frame are excluded.
What does this mean?