Data from: Indirect effects of parasitism: costs of infection to other individuals can be greater than direct costs borne by the host

Hanna M. V. Granroth-Wilding, Sarah J. Burthe, Sue Lewis, Katherine A. Herborn, Emi A. Takahashi, Francis Daunt & Emma J. A. Cunningham
Parasitic infection has a direct physiological cost to hosts but may also alter how hosts interact with other individuals in their environment. Such indirect effects may alter both host fitness and the fitness of other individuals in the host's social network, yet the relative impact of direct and indirect effects of infection are rarely quantified. During reproduction, a host's social environment includes family members who may be in conflict over resource allocation. In such situations,...
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