Data from: Reconstruction of the cortical maps of the Tasmanian tiger and comparison to the Tasmanian devil

Gregory S. Berns & Ken W. S. Ashwell
The last known Tasmanian tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus)–aka the thylacine–died in 1936. Because its natural behavior was never scientifically documented, we are left to infer aspects of its behavior from museum specimens and historical recollections of bushmen. Recent advances in brain imaging have made it possible to scan postmortem specimens of a wide range of animals, even more than a decade old. Any thylacine brain, however, would be more than 100 years old. Here, we show...
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