Data from: Parasite-offspring competition for female resources can explain male-biased parasitism in plants

Kirsty J. Yule & Kevin C. Burns
Male-biased susceptibility to parasites is common in dioecous plants. However, why males have higher parasite loads than females is unclear. Unlike males, females have to subsidize post-fertilization costs of reproduction (e.g. seed and fruit development). As a result, females may have smaller pools of resources potentially available to parasites, thus leading to lower parasite loads. We tested this prediction in New Zealand’s largest native moth (Aenetus virescens: Lepidoptera), whose larvae parasitize Aristotelia serrata (Elaeocarpaceae), an...
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