Data from: Prenatal exposure to predation affects predator recognition learning via lateralization plasticity

Tyrone Lucon-Xiccato, Douglas P. Chivers, Matthew D. Mitchell & Maud C. O. Ferrari
Prey with cerebral lateralization often shows a bias in escape direction and asymmetrical use of eyes for scanning. Such asymmetries are likely to cause ecological disadvantages when, for example, predators attack from the side in which the prey is more susceptible. However, lateralized individuals are diffuse in many species and, paradoxically, their frequency increases via developmental plasticity in environments with high-predation risk. Using wood frog tadpoles, Lithobates sylvaticus, we tested the hypothesis that cerebral lateralization...
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