Data from: Payoff-based learning explains the decline in cooperation in public goods games

Maxwell N. Burton-Chellew, Heinrich H. Nax & Stuart A. West
Economic games such as the public goods game are increasingly being used to measure social behaviours in humans and non-human primates. The results of such games have been used to argue that people are pro-social, and that humans are uniquely altruistic, willingly sacrificing their own welfare in order to benefit others. However, an alternative explanation for the empirical observations is that individuals are mistaken, but learn, during the game, how to improve their personal payoff....
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