Data from: A growth-defense trade-off is general across native and exotic grasses

Robert W. Heckman, Fletcher W. Halliday & Charles E. Mitchell
High-resource environments typically favor quick-growing, poorly-defended plants, while resource-poor environments typically favor slow-growing, well-defended plants. The prevailing hypothesis explaining this pattern states that, as resource availability increases, well-defended, slow-growing species are replaced by poorly defended, fast-growing species. A second hypothesis states that greater resource availability increases allocation to growth at the expense of defense, within species. Regardless of mechanism, if exotic species are released from enemies relative to natives, shifts in allocation to growth and...
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