Mandrill mothers associate with infants who look like their own offspring using phenotype matching

Marie Charpentier, Clémence Poirotte, Berta Roura-Torres, Paul Amblard-Rambert, Eric Willaume, Peter Kappeler, François Rousset & Julien Renoult
Behavioral discrimination of kin is a key process structuring social relationships in animals. In this study, we provide a first example of discrimination towards non-kin by third-parties through a mechanism of phenotype matching. In mandrills, we recently demonstrated increased facial resemblance among paternally-related juvenile and adult females indicating adaptive opportunities for paternal kin recognition. Here, we hypothesize that mothers use offspring’s facial resemblance with other infants to guide offspring’s social opportunities towards similarly-looking ones. Using...
1 citation reported since publication in 2022.
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