Data from: Mandible-powered escape jumps in trap-jaw ants increase survival rates during predator-prey encounters

Fredrick J. Larabee & Andrew V. Suarez
Animals use a variety of escape mechanisms to increase the probability of surviving predatory attacks. Antipredator defenses can be elaborate, making their evolutionary origin unclear. Trap-jaw ants are known for their rapid and powerful predatory mandible strikes, and some species have been observed to direct those strikes at the substrate, thereby launching themselves into the air away from a potential threat. This potential escape mechanism has never been examined in a natural context. We studied...
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