Data from: Continuum of vasodilator stress from rest to contrast medium to adenosine hyperemia for fractional flow reserve assessment

Nils P. Johnson, Allen Jeremias, Frederik M. Zimmermann, Julien Adjedj, Nils Witt, Barry Hennigan, Bon-Kwon Koo, Akiko Maehara, Mitsuaki Matsumura, Emanuele Barbato, Giovanni Esposito, Bruno Trimarco, Gilles Rioufol, Seung-Jung Park, Hyoung-Mo Yang, Sérgio B. Baptista, George S. Chrysant, Antonio M. Leone, Colin Berry, Bernard De Bruyne, K. Lance Gould, Richard L. Kirkeeide, Keith G. Oldroyd, Nico H. J. Pijls, William F. Fearon … & Nico H.J. Pijls
OBJECTIVES: We compared the diagnostic performance with adenosine-derived fractional flow reserve (FFR) #0.8 of contrast-based FFR (cFFR), resting distal pressure (Pd)/aortic pressure (Pa), and the instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR). BACKGROUND: FFR objectively identifies lesions that benefit from medical therapy versus revascularization. However, FFR requires maximal vasodilation, usually achieved with adenosine. Radiographic contrast injection causes submaximal coronary hyperemia. Therefore, intracoronary contrast could provide an easy and inexpensive tool for predicting FFR. METHODS: We recruited patients undergoing...
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