Data from: Testosterone reduces the threat premium in competitive resource division

Shawn N. Geniole, Valentina Proietti, Brian M. Bird, Triana L. Ortiz, Pierre L. Bonin, Bernard Goldfarb, Neil V. Watson & Justin M. Carré
Like other animals, humans are sensitive to facial cues of threat. Recent evidence suggests that we use this information to dynamically calibrate competitive decision-making over resources, ceding more to high threat individuals (who appear more willing/able to retaliate) and keeping more from low threat individuals. Little is known, however, about the biological factors that support such threat assessment and decision-making systems. In a pre-registered, placebo-controlled, cross-over testosterone administration study (n = 118 men), we show...
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These counts follow the COUNTER Code of Practice, meaning that Internet robots and repeats within a certain time frame are excluded.
What does this mean?