Data from: Host-parasite arms races and rapid changes in bird egg appearance

Claire N. Spottiswoode & Martin Stevens
Coevolutionary arms races are a powerful force driving evolution, adaptation, and diversification. They can generate phenotypic polymorphisms which render it harder for a coevolving parasite or predator to exploit any one individual of a given species. In birds, egg polymorphisms should be an effective defense against mimetic brood parasites, and are extreme in the African tawny-flanked prinia (Prinia subflava) and its parasite the cuckoo finch (Anomalospiza imberbis). Here we use models of avian visual perception...
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These counts follow the COUNTER Code of Practice, meaning that Internet robots and repeats within a certain time frame are excluded.
What does this mean?