Data from: Strong social relationships are associated with decreased longevity in a facultatively social mammal

Daniel T. Blumstein, Dana M. Williams, Alexandra N. Lim, Svenja Kroeger, Julien G.A. Martin & Julien G. A. Martin
Humans in strong social relationships are more likely to live longer because social relationships may buffer stressors and thus have protective effects. However, a shortcoming of human studies is that they often rely on self-reporting of these relationships. By contrast, observational studies of nonhuman animals permit detailed analyses of the specific nature of social relationships. Thus, discoveries that some social animals live longer and healthier lives if they are involved in social grooming, forage together,...
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