Data from: Hummingbirds control turning velocity using body orientation and turning radius using asymmetrical wingbeat kinematics

Tyson J. G. Read, Paolo S. Segre, Kevin M. Middleton & Douglas L. Altshuler
Turning in flight requires reorientation of force, which birds, bats and insects accomplish either by shifting body position and total force in concert or by using left–right asymmetries in wingbeat kinematics. Although both mechanisms have been observed in multiple species, it is currently unknown how each is used to control changes in trajectory. We addressed this problem by measuring body and wingbeat kinematics as hummingbirds tracked a revolving feeder, and estimating aerodynamic forces using a...
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