Data from: Increased behavioural lateralization in parasitized coral reef fish

Dominique G. Roche, Sandra A. Binning, Laura E. Strong, Jaclyn N. Davies & Michael D. Jennions
Preferential use of one side of the body for cognitive or behavioural tasks (lateralization) is common in many animals, including humans. However, few studies have demonstrated whether lateralization is phenotypically plastic, and varies depending on the ecological context. We studied lateralization (measured as a turning preference) in the bridled monocle bream (Scolopsis bilineatus). This coral reef fish is commonly infected by a large, ectoparasitic isopod (Anilocra nemipteri) that attaches to the left or right side...
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