Data from: Shared spatial effects on quantitative genetic parameters: accounting for spatial autocorrelation and home range overlap reduces estimates of heritability in wild red deer

Katie V. Stopher, Craig A. Walling, Alison Morris, Fiona E. Guinness, Tim H. Clutton-Brock, Josephine M. Pemberton & Daniel H. Nussey
Social structure, limited dispersal and spatial heterogeneity in resources are ubiquitous in wild vertebrate populations. As a result, relatives share environments as well as genes, and environmental and genetic sources of similarity between individuals are potentially confounded. Quantitative genetic studies in the wild therefore typically account for easily captured shared environmental effects (e.g. parent, nest or region). Fine-scale spatial effects are likely to be just as important in wild vertebrates, but have been largely ignored....
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