Data from: Trust thy neighbour in times of trouble: background risk alters how tadpoles release and respond to disturbance cues

Kevin R. Bairos-Novak, Matthew D. Mitchell, Adam L. Crane, Douglas P. Chivers, Maud C.O. Ferrari & Maud C. O. Ferrari
In aquatic environments, uninjured prey escaping a predator release chemical disturbance cues into the water. However, it is unknown whether these cues are a simple physiological by-product of increased activity or whether they represent a social signal that is under some control by the sender. Here, we exposed wood frog tadpoles (Lithobates sylvaticus) to either a high or low background risk environment and tested their responses to disturbance cues (or control cues) produced by tadpoles...
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