Data from: Do female Nicrophorus vespilloides reduce direct costs by choosing males that mate less frequently?

Paul E. Hopwood, Geoffrey P. F. Mazué, Mauricio J. Carter, Megan L. Head, Allen J. Moore & Nick J. Royle
Sexual conflict occurs when selection to maximize fitness in one sex does so at the expense of the other sex. In the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides, repeated mating provides assurance of paternity at a direct cost to female reproductive productivity. To reduce this cost, females could choose males with low repeated mating rates or smaller, servile males. We tested this by offering females a dichotomous choice between males from lines selected for high or low...
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These counts follow the COUNTER Code of Practice, meaning that Internet robots and repeats within a certain time frame are excluded.
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