Data from: Feather corticosterone reveals stress associated with dietary changes in a breeding seabird

Alexis P. Will, Yutaka Watanuki, Dale M. Kikuchi, Nobuhiko Sato, Motohiro Ito, Matt Callahan, Katherine Wynne-Edwards, Scott Hatch, Kyle H. Elliott, Leslie Slater, Akinori Takahashi, Alexander S. Kitaysky, Kyle Elliott, Alexis Will & Alexander Kitaysky
Changes in climate and anthropogenic pressures might affect the composition and abundance of forage fish in the world's oceans. The junk-food hypothesis posits that dietary shifts that affect the quality (e.g., energy content) of food available to marine predators may impact their physiological state and consequently affect their fitness. Previously, we experimentally validated that deposition of the adrenocortical hormone, corticosterone, in feathers is a sensitive measure of nutritional stress in seabirds. Here, we use this...
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