Data and code from: Light might suppress both types of sound-evoked anti-predator flight in moths

Holger R. Goerlitz, Theresa Hügel & Holger R. Goerlitz
Urbanization exposes wild animals to increased levels of light, affecting particularly nocturnal animals. Artificial light at night might shift the balance of predator-prey interactions, for example of nocturnal echolocating bats and eared moths. Moths exposed to light show less last-ditch manoeuvres in response to attacking close-by bats. In contrast, the extent to which negative phonotaxis, moths’ first line of defence against distant bats, is affected by light is unclear. Here, we aimed to quantify the...
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2 downloads reported since publication in 2020.

These counts follow the COUNTER Code of Practice, meaning that Internet robots and repeats within a certain time frame are excluded.
What does this mean?