Data from: Tuatara and a new morphometric dataset for Rhynchocephalia: comments on Herrera‐Flores et al

Felix Vaux, Mary Morgan-Richards, Elizabeth E. Daly & Steven A. Trewick
It has recently been suggested that a ‘living fossil’ can be identified because it is both morphologically conservative and exhibits a significantly slower rate of morphological evolution compared to related lineages (Herrera-Flores et al. 2017). As an exemplar, variation among known rhynchocephalians was investigated, and it was concluded that the New Zealand tuatara Sphenodon punctatus Gray, 1831 is a living fossil species (Herrera-Flores et al. 2017). In addition to the dubious biological meaning and basis...
1 citation reported since publication in 2018.
143 views reported since publication in 2018.

These counts follow the COUNTER Code of Practice, meaning that Internet robots and repeats within a certain time frame are excluded.
What does this mean?
37 downloads reported since publication in 2018.

These counts follow the COUNTER Code of Practice, meaning that Internet robots and repeats within a certain time frame are excluded.
What does this mean?