Echolocating toothed whales use ultra-fast echo-kinetic responses to track evasive prey

Heather Vance, Peter Madsen, Natacha Aguilar De Soto, Danuta Wisniewska, Michael Ladegaard, Sascha Hooker & Mark Johnson
Visual predators rely on fast-acting optokinetic responses to track and capture agile prey. Most toothed whales, however, rely on echolocation for hunting and have converged on biosonar clicking rates reaching 500/s during prey pu rsuits. If echoes are processed on a click by click basis, as assumed, neural responses 100x faster than those in vision are required to keep pace with this information flow. Using high resolution bio-logging of wild predator prey interactions we show...
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