Data from: Fully automated sequence alignment methods are comparable to, and much faster than, traditional methods in large data sets: an example with hepatitis B virus

Therese A. Catanach, Andrew D. Sweet, Nam-Phuong D. Nguyen, Rhiannon M. Peery, Andrew H. Debevec, Andrea K. Thomer, Amanda C. Owings, Bret M. Boyd, Aron D. Katz, Felipe N. Soto-Adames & Julie M. Allen
Aligning sequences for phylogenetic analysis (multiple sequence alignment; MSA) is an important, but increasingly computationally expensive step with the recent surge in DNA sequence data. Much of this sequence data is publicly available, but can be extremely fragmentary (i.e., a combination of full genomes and genomic fragments), which can compound the computational issues related to MSA. Traditionally, alignments are produced with automated algorithms and then checked and/or corrected “by eye” prior to phylogenetic inference. However,...
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