Data from: Better the devil you know? how familiarity and kinship affect prey responses to disturbance cues

Kevin R. Bairos-Novak, Adam L. Crane, Douglas P. Chivers, Maud C.O. Ferrari & Maud C O Ferrari
Prey can greatly improve their odds of surviving predator encounters by eavesdropping on conspecific risk cues, but the reliability of these cues depends on both previous accuracy as well as the cue’s relevance. During a predator chase, aquatic prey release chemical disturbance cues that may vary in their reliability depending on the individuals receiving them. Thus, prey may rely differentially on disturbance cues from familiar individuals (due to previous experience) or from kin (due to...
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These counts follow the COUNTER Code of Practice, meaning that Internet robots and repeats within a certain time frame are excluded.
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