Invasion history shapes host transcriptomic response to a body-snatching parasite

Zachary Tobias, Amy Fowler, April Blakeslee, John Darling, Mark Torchin, Whitman Miller, Gregory Ruiz & Carolyn Tepolt
By shuffling biogeographic distributions, biological invasions can both disrupt long-standing associations between hosts and parasites and establish new ones. This creates natural experiments with which to study the ecology and evolution of host-parasite interactions. In estuaries of the Gulf of Mexico, the white-fingered mud crab (Rhithropanopeus harrisii) is infected by a native parasitic barnacle Loxothylacus panopaei (Rhizocephala), which manipulates host physiology and behavior. In the 1960s, L. panopaei was introduced to the Chesapeake Bay and...
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