Data from: Too important to tamper with: predation risk affects body mass and escape behaviour but not escape ability

Benjamin T. Walters, Tin Nok Natalie Cheng, Justin Doyle, Christopher G. Guglielmo, Michael Clinchy, Liana Y. Zanette & Chistopher G. Guglielmo
1. Escaping from a predator is a matter of life or death, and prey are expected to adaptively alter their physiology under chronic predation risk in ways that may affect escape. Theoretical models assume that escape performance is mass-dependent whereby scared prey strategically maintain an optimal body mass to enhance escape. Experiments testing the mass-dependent predation risk (MDPR) hypothesis have demonstrated that prior experience of predation risk can affect body mass, and the behavioural decisions...
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