Data from: Sex-specific pace-of-life syndromes

Joe A. Moschilla, Joseph L. Tomkins & Leigh W. Simmons
The pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis considers an animal’s behavior, physiology, and life-history as non-independent components of a single integrated phenotype. However, frequent deviations from the expected correlations between POLS traits suggests that these relationships may be context, and potentially, sex-dependent. To determine whether the sexes express distinct POLS trait covariance structures, we observed the behavior (mobility, latency to emerge from a shelter), physiology (mass-specific metabolic rate) and life-history (lifespan, development time) of male and female...
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These counts follow the COUNTER Code of Practice, meaning that Internet robots and repeats within a certain time frame are excluded.
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